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17th Century Food Experiments.

lonewolf

Neo Luddite Prepared Survivalist.
Messages
7,968
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1,310
a scientific friend once said that our ancient ancestors used to eat about 2000 different types of food, modern people only eat about 200 types, many eat less than that.
 

greenbear

Extremely Addicted
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2,581
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960
Certainly the older diet was for more varied. It is worth looking up some of the monastic recipes that remain to see how many edible plants that grow in abundance we simply ignore today. An example is "Good King Henry" that grows in most gardens, its name giving it a sense of historical perspective.
 

Keith

Very Addicted
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1,630
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930
Age
74
Our philosophy is; grow what grows well & get to like it. I think foraging for food is the same. Good food is good food, you can't afford to not eat it. Stinging nettle tastes great, & they grow well in many places.
Keith.
 

lonewolf

Neo Luddite Prepared Survivalist.
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7,968
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most wild plants are only good to eat when there is new growth in the spring, later on in the year they get a bit woody.
 

Barbara

Extremely Talkative
Messages
246
Points
490
Age
56
Our philosophy is; grow what grows well & get to like it. I think foraging for food is the same. Good food is good food, you can't afford to not eat it. Stinging nettle tastes great, & they grow well in many places.
Keith.
Nettle soup, nettle beer, nettle scones, nettle muffins - the list goes on and it makes good plant food (soak in water, strain and dilute the liquid) and compost accelerator. It is also an indicator of fertile soil. That's how we discovered we had a problem with our septic tank!
 
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