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2022 Trig Point Challenge

Madriverrob

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A quick update to maintain the running order of this thread ( I'm using it to evidence the challenge ).

This weekend managed to bag :

TP 5734 Roseberry Topping


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And then

TP 8952 Captain Cook's Monument


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Madriverrob

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Another Trig point bagged yesterday during my lunch break .

TP 1697 - Brow Top

This trig is located above the Hamlet of Robin Hood's Bay with some fantastic views of the coast as far as Ravenscar . The trig has been adopted and now features some personal memorials to local people who have passed away .

This area is rich in history and the trig is co located alongside three ancient burial barrows . I was talking to the farmer and he was telling me that two have been mowed but that the third remains covered in gorse as Historic England believe it has not been excavated and may still contain historic artefacts .




The trig is located close to Skerry Hall Farm , Alan the farmer was both friendly and informative about the local history , he runs a working beef farm and Bed and Breakfast and although I haven't stayed there I would be happy to recommend them on the basis of my chat with him .


There are considerable artefacts in the museum in Whitby , all have been found locally


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Madriverrob

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Managed a few Trig points over the Easter weekend …..

Yesterday marked the 80th Anniversary of the Trig Pillar .

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On 18 April 1936 a group of surveyors gathered around a white concrete pillar in a field in Cold Ashby and began the retriangulation of Great Britain. That trig pillar is still standing 80 years on, along with thousands more around the country. We’re celebrating by sharing the story of the humble trig pillar, still much loved by walkers today, and giving you the chance to join our celebrations with The Trig Pillar Trail Challenge.

The shining (sometimes) white monoliths are now instantly recognised by any walker, or geography lover and have inspired many a trigbagger. They’re quintessentially British, and even made it onto Bill Bryson’s list of favourite British items in his 2015 book ‘The Road to Little Dribbling’. But what were they for? Now largely redundant, back in 1936, they formed a state-of-the-art network built to re-map Britain, dreamt up by Brigadier Martin Hotine. Responsible for the design, planning and implementation of the retriangulation, Hotine also designed the iconic trig pillar to provide a solid base for the theodolites used by the survey teams to improve the accuracy of their reading.

Some 6,500 were built, to be used for triangulation, the mathematical process that makes accurate map making possible. It works by determining the location of a point by measuring angles to it from known points at either end of a fixed baseline and in this case, those known points were the 6,500 trig pillars, across the country. OS surveying teams spent 26 years gathering measurements across Britain to create a highly accurate map of the country, but time and technologies have moved on enormously to the point where the traditional trig pillar is now obsolete in its original guise. They still act as a beacon for many an outdoors lover, but they no longer help shape our maps. Look out for tomorrow’s blog where we’ll share more detail on the history of the trig pillar, how they were built and used, the inner workings and much more.

Although 6,500+ trig pillars were built, hundreds have been lost to housing developments, farming, coastal erosion and other causes. The greatest source of information on trig pillars (and other Ordnance Survey surveying marks) is www.trigpointing.uk. Users on there regularly ‘bag’ trig pillars and take photos to track their condition.

While there are many trig-baggers out there, trig-bagger extraordinaire Rob Woodall completed his 13-year mission to bag all of Britain’s trig pillars last weekend in Fife. He’s bagged 6,190 trig pillars, a seriously impressive achievement. We joined his final bagging expedition and awarded him a mounted flush bracket to mark the moment. Look out for Thursday’s blog with more details on his final trig-bagging adventure.

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TP 6242 - Suffield

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And

TP 2392 - Coomb Hill

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Madriverrob

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Big day out Trig Bagging yesterday , managed four and a 10k walk to get them .

These were around RAF Fylingdales in the heart of the North Yorkshire Moors .

Interesting fact from yesterday is that there are two auxiliary trigs in the area , possibly due to the proximity of the RAF base and it’s importance during the Cold War .

The auxiliary points are made of an upturned concrete pipe with a spider on top …. The two locally are both badly frost damaged .

First up

TP 7931 - Louven Howe Aux 2

A quick bag of a very unusual trig type. Parked in a lay-by and skipped through barely 100m of heather to reach it. It's a concrete pipe set on end and filled with concrete and then has had a spider affixed. The outer pipe has cracked presumably due to weathering and the pieces are at the foot of the pillar. Very interesting bag, and as it's not on OS 1:25k maps I wouldn't have known about it if it weren't for this site.

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Then a not inconsiderable hike across the moor following the perimeter fence of the RAF base up to an ancient marker post high on the moor .

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Lilla cross sits at the high point of the moor and has played an important role in the local landscape for centuries.


A short walk from the cross lies the next trig and it’s auxiliary partner , interestingly all in line of site .
The cross marks a welcome site on the route of the Lyke Wake Walk ( more of that towards the end of May 😬).

TP 4552 - Louven Howe


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Close by lies

TP 7930 - Louven Howe Aux 1

Bagged at the same time as my visit to the main pillar (TP4552). Very badly damaged, with a lot of the outer casing having fallen away.


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After a walk back to the car and a short drive I bagged the final trig of the day .

TP 4017 - Horcum

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Joecole

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I'm going to give it a go in May , but over a couple of days , with some wild camping thrown in .......
The start as you already know Rob is Osmotherly or if you do it in reverse the Ravenscar Hotel. Either way the ideal overnight stop is the White Lion on Blakey Ridge, I used to overnight in the field behind the pub
 

Madriverrob

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While I was plotting my next Trigpoints I noticed a couple locally that I had missed , managed to get one this morning whilst out on a visit to someone . Short hop around the field and picture taken from a bit of a distance as there was a water filled ditch that I couldn't jump in my work clothes. I have another planned for the weekend and then a little break .

TP1072 -Barton Rigg


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peteff

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I never took any notice of this before but we have one of these near here at Ashover Rock ( the Fabrick, pronounced fay brick) It's a local landmark about 3 miles from us and is a great spotting point for the area.

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