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A few plant suggestions to forage in June.

Paul N

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There is an abundance of edible plants at this time of year, these are just a few that I think are worth trying.

Elderflower
Easy to identify. The flowers, after a rinse in cold water, can be used to make a delicious cordial, you can also make Elderflower wine. Or, dip them in a light batter, such as tempura, and deep fry them. Our Caledonian contingent @Ark79 should be especially partial to the latter.

Honeysuckle
You can't mistake these for anything else and the scent is a strong clue. On a walk you might like to just stop and split the flower open to the base and stick your tongue it to get the nectar.

Just a few flowers will make a very refreshing tea, or add a few flowers to sparkling wine, or even sparkling water, for something special.

Lime aka Linden tree
We have two types of native lime tree in this country - large leaved and small leaved, however they often hybridise. Small leaved lime also goes under the name of Linden Tree. When they are in flower the beautiful scent will come wafting to you on the breeze from a great distance. The flowers can be picked and eaten as they are, or made into a sandwich. They also make a very good tea, which can also be made from the dried flowers.

Pineapple weed
A low growing little plant, often seen at the edge of paths and at the fringes of fields. Identified by the flowers, which look like tiny yellow-green pineapples. They don't just look like pineapples, crush the flower and it will smell of pineapple. About a dozen of these flowers make a very good 'pineapple' tea.

Sea kale
If you are lucky enough to be able to get to a shingle beach you will often see this splendid plant, which looks very similar to domestic kale. All parts of the plants are edible and, in winter, the roots are a good source of carbohydrates. However, best not to dig them up, but rather just pick a few leaves which can be used just like cabbage. I find the leaves just as good eaten raw.
 

Paul N

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Have you tried the nettle tea Paul ?
I've never made nettle tea, only used nettles as a vegetable, cooking them like spinach. The tea I really like is Ivan's tea (it originated in Russia, I believe), and it's made from Rosebay Willowherb - a very common plant. I will be out foraging some RBW in the next few days, to lay in a supply of tea. It takes a bit of processing, including a short lacto-ferment, but the result is stunning. I've been to China and tasted some of their highly prestigious (and expensive) fancy teas, and I rate Ivan's tea alongside it. I'll bring some to the meet in September - if I don't use it all! :) P.S. You didn't say which Paul, I just assumed you meant me.
 
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Ark79

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I've never made nettle tea, only used nettles as a vegetable, cooking them like spinach. The tea I really like is Ivan's tea (it originated in Russia, I believe), and it's made from Rosebay Willowherb - a very common plant. I will be out foraging some RBW in the next few days, to lay in a supply of tea. It takes a bit of processing, including a short lacto-ferment, but the result is stunning. I've been to China and tasted some of their highly prestigious (and expensive) fancy teas, and I rate Ivan's tea alongside it. I'll bring some to the meet in September - if I don't use it all! :) P.S. You didn't say which Paul, I just assumed you meant me.

Just search the Google for rosebay willowherb or fireweed…. I recognise that plant , it’s a very versatile plant in ways of healing properties according to Wikipedia, fat loss property’s also…

Glad you made that assumption, I bloody learned something 😂
 

Paul N

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Just search the Google for rosebay willowherb or fireweed…. I recognise that plant , it’s a very versatile plant in ways of healing properties according to Wikipedia, fat loss property’s also…

Glad you made that assumption, I bloody learned something 😂
I'm don't bother too much with the medicinal side of wild plants, sorting out the facts from the fiction and myth is not easy, better to just concentrate on my stomach! :) You can also Google Ivan's tea (or Ivan chai) for the method. Apart from the picking it involves a bit of preparation work in the kitchen, then you just have to dry it. The result is worth waiting for, I'd be surprised if you can tell the difference between Ivan's tea and a good quality Chinese tea.
 

Ark79

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@Paul N are these fireweed/rosebay willowherb ?
0714D5EC-351D-4578-8FAF-05737B0CCF98.jpeg
80B3E371-A3FF-4643-B8FB-6710756555DC.jpeg
58F24B82-5C84-49F0-AB32-50ABE5FF8E37.jpeg
79345B19-D175-4742-82F2-75347E210CC3.jpeg
 

Paul N

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The first two pictures are a bit out of focus but I'm pretty confident they are Lupins. Garden plants that have escaped by the looks of things. The last two pictures are Rosebay Willowherb (fireweed), something that I picked the other day and is now being turned into Ivan Chai (tea) in my kitchen. I plan to bring some to the Sept meet. I can also see stinging nettles and cleavers in the picture - both edible.
 

Joecole

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The first two pictures are a bit out of focus but I'm pretty confident they are Lupins. Garden plants that have escaped by the looks of things. The last two pictures are Rosebay Willowherb (fireweed), something that I picked the other day and is now being turned into Ivan Chai (tea) in my kitchen. I plan to bring some to the Sept meet. I can also see stinging nettles and cleavers in the picture - both edible.
Definitely Lupins, Rosebay is purpley red
 
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Around here the Balsam tends to grow mainly along the riverbanks and margins while the rose bay willow herb does actually prefer old fire sites and woodland clearings. Even though the balsam is considered to be an invasive pest species it is a very good source of nectar while the rose bay willow herb is excellent for our native butterflies.
 

Baytree

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. The tea I really like is Ivan's tea (it originated in Russia, I believe), and it's made from Rosebay Willowherb - a very common plant. I will be out foraging some RBW in the next few days, to lay in a supply of tea. It takes a bit of processing, including a short lacto-ferment, but the result is stunning. I've been to China and tasted some of their highly prestigious (and expensive) fancy teas, and I rate Ivan's tea alongside it. I'll bring some to the meet in September - if I don't use it all! :) P.S. You didn't say which Paul, I just assumed you meant me.
I'll have to try this processing. In the past I've just simply dried the plant , including the flowers , crumbled it up and used as tea. I was actually pretty pleased with just doing that in that it tasted like proper tea unlike a lot of herbal teas. Going off slightly I've also made the dandelion root coffee even though I don't drink it . My wife drinks coffee and she said it wasn't too bad . I started with a bucket of roots and after drying , roasting and so on I was left with a relatively small amount of coffee "powder" . Doable but I have doubts as to whether it was worth it.
 

Paul N

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Messages
197
Points
820
I'll have to try this processing. In the past I've just simply dried the plant , including the flowers , crumbled it up and used as tea. I was actually pretty pleased with just doing that in that it tasted like proper tea unlike a lot of herbal teas. Going off slightly I've also made the dandelion root coffee even though I don't drink it . My wife drinks coffee and she said it wasn't too bad . I started with a bucket of roots and after drying , roasting and so on I was left with a relatively small amount of coffee "powder" . Doable but I have doubts as to whether it was worth it.
Yes, that's what I like about Ivan Chai, it really tastes like proper tea. As you say, most of the other, so called, teas taste nothing like it - but this really does. I've never tried dandelion root coffee. My father told me that it was being made by the Germans in WW2, and added that, when he tried it, it tasted nothing like it.
For the full Ivan Chai process just look online, there's plenty to look at.
 

Baytree

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The dandelion stuff did smell like coffee when I made it . I can't comment on the taste but my wife said it wasn't too bad although of course there's no caffeine in it. It was improved by a small addition of real coffee but to be honest if the real stuff is available the time and effort involved in making the substitute seems to make it not worth the while. I seem to vaguely recall Germany making ersatz coffee out of acorns and going back to the tea I've read that raspberry leaves were the go to tea substitute for many parts during the war.
 

Joecole

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I'll have to try this processing. In the past I've just simply dried the plant , including the flowers , crumbled it up and used as tea. I was actually pretty pleased with just doing that in that it tasted like proper tea unlike a lot of herbal teas. Going off slightly I've also made the dandelion root coffee even though I don't drink it . My wife drinks coffee and she said it wasn't too bad . I started with a bucket of roots and after drying , roasting and so on I was left with a relatively small amount of coffee "powder" . Doable but I have doubts as to whether it was worth it.
You can do the same with acorns
The dandelion stuff did smell like coffee when I made it . I can't comment on the taste but my wife said it wasn't too bad although of course there's no caffeine in it. It was improved by a small addition of real coffee but to be honest if the real stuff is available the time and effort involved in making the substitute seems to make it not worth the while. I seem to vaguely recall Germany making ersatz coffee out of acorns and going back to the tea I've read that raspberry leaves were the go to tea substitute for many parts during the war.
I sometimes thank that our grandmothers and great grandmothers were a lot more knowledgeable than we are at least those from rural areas were
 
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