• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.
  • Welcome to Life In The Wilderness

    You are currently viewing the site as a guest and some content may not be available to you.

    Registration is quick and easy and will give you full access to the site and allow you to ask questions or make comments and join in on the conversation. If you would like to join then please Register

A new toy, a Swedish barrel knife.

Ystranc

Moderator
Messages
2,093
Likes
1,864
Points
860
#1
Some of you may have noticed that I'm a bit of a collector of old crap. I've wanted one of these for a while but have been unable to find any for a price that I was willing or able to pay. This week the constellations finally fell into alignment.
It was made in Sweden by Jon Engstrom in 1874, condition wise it is almost mint.:)
 

Attachments

Joecole

Moderator
Staff member
Messages
8,954
Likes
4,264
Points
1,190
Age
73
#2
Some of you may have noticed that I'm a bit of a collector of old crap. I've wanted one of these for a while but have been unable to find any for a price that I was willing or able to pay. This week the constellations finally fell into alignment.
It was made in Sweden by Jon Engstrom in 1874, condition wise it is almost mint.:)
That's a very nice looking knife Ystranc, how does it feel strength wise?
 
Messages
11,002
Likes
5,934
Points
1,540
Age
64
#4
Hi Ystranc :)

You must be delighted to have found this knife after searching for so long.
Never seen one like it......looks well made to.

Never thought I would see something posted on here that is older than JoeCole. :whistle:

Pleased for you mate......enjoy your new toy:thumbsup::)
 

Ystranc

Moderator
Messages
2,093
Likes
1,864
Points
860
#9
Is your Dad still with us Keith? My Dad has done much the same thing in the past and lived to tell the tale....but only just.
He's not one of the more technically minded members of our family, I won't even let him wire a plug these days.
 

Keith 66

Quite Talkative
Messages
27
Likes
28
Points
360
#10
My Dad died 3 years ago at the good age of 89, he was a good boatbuilder & woodworker. But like yours he was not the most technically minded! Once i came home from college to find he had broken one of the wheels on his bench grinder when moving some timber, the wheel was broken into 3 pieces. And so he took it off & glued it back together with araldite. It ran fine! I bought him a new wheel, fitted it & smashed the glued one with a hammer.
He was not impressed. But i had seen the safety film of what happens when one bursts & had seen the aftermath of a bad grinder accident.
 

Ystranc

Moderator
Messages
2,093
Likes
1,864
Points
860
#11
Omg! I know araldite is good stuff but...omg!
Thankfully my dad isn't even that capable these days. He just complains to my mum that somethings not working/broken, she calls me or my sister and by the time he's forgotten it didn't work and goes to use it again it's been fixed or replaced. I also have a sister whose husband is a maintenance man at a big factory....between us we try to curb my dad's worst DIY attempts....araldite? Omg! I can't get over that....it was lucky that you caught on to what he'd done.
 
Last edited:

Keith 66

Quite Talkative
Messages
27
Likes
28
Points
360
#12
I should have kept it, our H&S trainer at school would have paid me to see that wheel! He couldnt believe it either.