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Ages apart.

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Rooting around in boxes as I'm inclined to do occasionally, I turned out two items of family history. Nothing spectacular but memory jogging all the same.
A knife that my Dad always carried, usually in the right hand small pocket of his waistcoat, watch on chain left pocket..:D
Once a Sheep foot blade, modified by literally decades of sharpening. It's marked, 'Sheepsfoot knife' and 'Hand forged' on the blade and near the pivot on one side Wm? Rogers & son. Norfolk st: Sheffield and on the other side an asterisk * and what looks like an Imperial German or Maltese cross.

It would be dangerous to pocket carry as the blade tip is no longer covered by the handle, which is some kind of ultra hard wood, I think.
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In the same box a knife I carried as a young sprog. I was convinced by the inscription on the handle that it was just the sort of knife that a Cowboy would carry..Had to be surely? " Cousin Willie's Hunting and fishing Knife " clearly stamped on the handle. Lock knife, 3.5 inch blade, I carried it every day and even let the Gardening Teacher Mr Bright use it when he needed a knife during a lesson...Pre hysteria days.



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Unboxing memories...:lol:
 
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:D In the late 1950's 'Teddy Boys' may have carried Flick Knives, but ordinary kids carried pen/pocket knives of various types. For School holiday Den building or Scouts it was usually a Sheffield sheath knife with leather stack handle or if you were rich or posh a stag handle.

Swinging the lamp a little...I can remember the village Copper stopping us, that is our gang, 7-12 years old and confiscating our Ash sapling spears which he said were dangerous because we had sharpened points on them. Didn't say a word about our sheath knives or the Bill hook one of the kids had smuggled out of his Dad's shed.
I afterwards wondered why the Runner Beans in the village Copper's garden grew up what looked suspiciously like our spears. :lol:
 

Ystranc

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Both beautiful knives. The William Rogers knife in particular is my kind of thing but you may find that the Cousin Willie's knife is actually very collectable.
It was a more innocent age when most men and boys carried a pocket knife...Boy Scouts, girl guides etc it was just normal
You can make the Rogers knife close by filing down the kicker (the little lump next to the tang) so that the edge sits closer to the spring
 
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