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Keith

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Jersey_L_le_au_Guerdain_Jersey.jpg

L'Île au Guerdain Jersey.

Any thoughts on the advantages of moving to the islands post shtf?
Jersey, Isle of Wight or Guernsey? I camped out on Jersey many years ago, that is where I first learnt to peel spuds with a clasp knife. We had to carry water back to camp from one of the roadside springs. One of the best times I ever had in the UK.
Other nearly uninhabited Islands: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_islands_of_the_Bailiwick_of_Jersey
 

lonewolf

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the one problem with islands is no where to run to if one gets over run, at least on the mainland you can move to the next parish or the next county but on an island you fall into the sea.
one would have to have a boat and post shtf with no fuel being refined that would have to be a sailboat and that demands experience and I am no sailor or yachtsman. I am a landlubber. I prefer my feet on terra firmer.
 

Keith

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the one problem with islands is no where to run to if one gets over run, at least on the mainland you can move to the next parish or the next county but on an island you fall into the sea.
one would have to have a boat and post shtf with no fuel being refined that would have to be a sailboat and that demands experience and I am no sailor or yachtsman. I am a landlubber. I prefer my feet on terra firmer.

Yes I can see your point, but still it is an alternative. I have sailed with a fixed sail on a period style boat, & I am no sailor either. I think that if push came to shove you could manage it. As far as no where to run, well if you have the boat you have an escape route. Those islands are pretty big just the same, & they have WW2 bunkers still in place. I think that if I were still in the UK, & given the fact that much of the countryside has now been built on, I would certainly be considering the option of moving to one of the islands.
Keith.
 

The Boogie Man

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From a resource point of view seashores are an excellent choice. Many prehistoric sites are found on the coastline because of the wide variety of food that can be gathered.
 

Keith

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From a resource point of view seashores are an excellent choice. Many prehistoric sites are found on the coastline because of the wide variety of food that can be gathered.
Totally agree, & I loved living on the coast in the UK, but I hate the coast in Australia. Too hot & too many nasties just waiting to get ya!!!
Keith.
 

The Boogie Man

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Totally agree, & I loved living on the coast in the UK, but I hate the coast in Australia. Too hot & too many nasties just waiting to get ya!!!
Keith.
It's Oz mate---nasties are everywhere, worth the risk to get your hands on one of those fat Mud Crabs though yum yum.
 

lonewolf

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most of the original UK settlements started on the coast or near rivers because of the availability of wild food found there, also it was safer to travel around the coast or up rivers in some form of boat that it was to travel overland when the country was covered in thick forests with many dangerous wild animals.
 

greenbear

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It is about weighing up risks. I do not think it is possible to suggest that one place might be better than another unless one is discussing a particular scenario. For example in the case of a pandemic I would suggest that a city might not be a good place to be. But if we had an extreme weather event or sea level rise the coast could be equally dangerous. Islands can become cut off - during WW2 the Channel Islands population got very near to starving at one point.
 

lonewolf

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of course the channel islands were invaded and towards the end of the war even the Germans stationed there were starving too.
in general I think i'm better of where I am, rural area on high ground.
 

greenbear

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I would choose higher ground in a rural area, but probably because I am more comfortable in that environment than for any real practical reasons.
 

lonewolf

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well I wouldn't want to be in a city at any time not just post SHTF but then I am comfortable without other people around.
 

greenbear

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I am not a city fan at all. Not been to London in twenty years and it can stay that way as far as I care. Bristol is the biggest place I venture into (and that's very busy these years).
 

lonewolf

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I was born in Bristol but never lived there, I haven't been to London since the middle 70s, 4 FATAL stabbings there the last 24 hours so its not somewhere I want to go.
I was brought up in Plymouth but I haven't been near the place since we left nearly 20 years ago.
cities are not part of my current lifestyle.
 
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Jersey_L_le_au_Guerdain_Jersey.jpg

L'Île au Guerdain Jersey.

Any thoughts on the advantages of moving to the islands post shtf?
Jersey, Isle of Wight or Guernsey? I camped out on Jersey many years ago, that is where I first learnt to peel spuds with a clasp knife. We had to carry water back to camp from one of the roadside springs. One of the best times I ever had in the UK.
Other nearly uninhabited Islands: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_islands_of_the_Bailiwick_of_Jersey
In reply to your original question Keith, if I could afford a little place on one of the smaller islands in the British Isles I would move to it in a heartbeat. I grew up on the coast and it's where I'm most comfortable. The main issue stopping me is the risk of rising sea levels and erosion.
 

Keith

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In reply to your original question Keith, if I could afford a little place on one of the smaller islands in the British Isles I would move to it in a heartbeat. I grew up on the coast and it's where I'm most comfortable. The main issue stopping me is the risk of rising sea levels and erosion.
I agree, I would be settling on higher ground if it were me. The same applies worldwide now, there will be a lot of expensive properties in Australia going under water in the future.
Keith.
 

lonewolf

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coastal areas are very prevalent to disasters, on the south coast there have been many landslides due to the underlying soil structure and heavy rains, coastal erosion etc.,some people have lost their houses.
even inland low lying places are also subject to flooding for example The Somerset Levels.
higher ground away from the coast is always a better location for safety reasons, the official advise when flooding or a tsunami is expected is to get to higher ground so why not live there on a permanent basis?
 

swamp rat

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I like the sound of an island, it would depend on the type of SHTF problem of course, I live near the coast in Swansea, and feel like I could survive on most coast line, there would be less people, and hopefully be less problems
 
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