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Back in the box.

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Periodic cleaning time in the gun cupboard and I unearthed a knife whose disappearance had me baffled for some time. I found it hiding in the trigger springs, odd screws, might need that box...:lol:

James Spratt was an American gentleman credited with being the first to manufacture dedicated Dog food commercially, starting in the 1860's. At that time Dogs were simply fed left overs and scraps from human meals. For a change, it really is something that originated in the USA. Following on from the Dog food success his company began making animal and Game Bird feed, which is where my knife comes in.

Spratt's Salesmen gave away free samples and other items to regular customers and of course Game Keepers. This knife originated via that process and an old Scottish Game Keeper who worked for the Duke of Newcastle prior to and after 1900.

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A Corkscrew for his Lordship's wine or the Keeper's corked Beer bottle and occasionally useful for other tasks. The Button Hook was essential in the days of button and laced shooting Gaiters

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The brass bolster is cut to grip cartridge rims and act as an extractor for stuck fired cartridges, a not uncommon occurrence in the days of paper cases, black powder and shoots where hot guns fired hundreds of cartridges in a day's shooting.
The tweezers were good for plucking thorns from humans and dogs and the idea was adopted by other knife makers.

Shown alongside my edc Wenger.
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And now back where it should be, in it's own box..:D

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Ystranc

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Sax, that is actually a rare and valuable knife. I'm glad it's not lost anymore.
I'd be interested to know if there are any other makers marks stamped into the tang of the blade. I've seen one similar but with a saw and spear point blade instead of the button hook.
 
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Mike, the small brass plates on the handle at the pivot point of the button hook and corkscrew bears the inscription
Spratts Patent. The remaining marks on the blade are very worn. On one side of the blade only appears what looks like

.......seph
.......stby
Sheffield

I cannot determine the number of letters before the seph or stby but those letters are fairly distinct.
 

Ystranc

Moderator
Messages
7,261
Points
1,710
Mike, the small brass plates on the handle at the pivot point of the button hook and corkscrew bears the inscription
Spratts Patent. The remaining marks on the blade are very worn. On one side of the blade only appears what looks like

.......seph
.......stby
Sheffield

I cannot determine the number of letters before the seph or stby but those letters are fairly distinct.
Joseph Westby was a well known Sheffield cutler around that time, it could be him. I have a couple of his early stainless steel knives. The stamp would be similar to this.
 

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Messages
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That looks like the man, Mike. Although it may look like I have used an abrasive to clean the name, in fact I used a kitchen sponge which has left the marks in the patina on the Bolster, which I'm pretty sure will soon return now the knife is back in it's proper place.
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