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Do Any Of You Go Camping?

Keith

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Age
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Do any of you go camping with your bug-out equipment & practice skills?
Keith.
 

The Boogie Man

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I don't camp out much now, if I do it's for a bit of night fishing. My skills are broadly based around pre-historic technology, and I practice them constantly.
 

Keith

Very Addicted
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I don't camp out much now, if I do it's for a bit of night fishing. My skills are broadly based around pre-historic technology, and I practice them constantly.
Good one.
Keith.
 

Keith

Very Addicted
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71
I have been known to go (solo) backpacking and wild camping on Dartmoor.
Oh yes, was on Dartmoor over new year. Do it several times a year, the full bushy thing.
I know, like me, that you plan to stay put if it all hits the fan, but do you think that your normal camping gear would suffice IF you did have to leave home for some reason?
Same with you Brownbear, would your normal camp gear be enough?
Keith.
 

lonewolf

Neo Luddite Prepared Survivalist.
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yes I carry everything I need on my back.
there would be a slight difference to some of the stuff I carry, for instance a Gaz(gas) stove- this is needed on Dartmoor because open fires are banned on the moor because of the fire risk. but pretty much everything else would stay the same.
 
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I practice travelling light and moving between waypoints in a similar way to orienteering but I don't run. This just involves a 30 Litre pack... its as much an exploration of an area and a map reading exercise as anything else
 
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A little off topic here but is anyone else having issues with the new site layout on an iPad? I had to dig my old Mac out of the cupboard to get on the forum. I can't get the onscreen keyboard to open on the iPad.
 

greenbear

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I know, like me, that you plan to stay put if it all hits the fan, but do you think that your normal camping gear would suffice IF you did have to leave home for some reason?
Same with you Brownbear, would your normal camp gear be enough?
Keith.
Yes m8 it would. I have good durable stuff, flint and steel kit and the like. Everything was chosen to have a long lifespan (of course it won't last forever, but better than most).
 

Harry Palmer

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I think my kit would look after me. You can buy kit on a low budget and some of it works well but IMHO some key bits of kit are worth splashing out on. I'm happy with a Bergen pack and side pouches as it 'fits' me well and don't cost a lot. I have a few sleeping bags, some down, some synthetic but all well made and expensive and all perform well. Army Goretex bivvy bags are cheap enough but well made and do a grand job (and add a season to your sleeping bag). I've a 20+ year old down jacket which cost me a lot at the time but has served me well in very cold conditions but that said you can pick up an army 'softie' jacket which is synthetic but works extremely certainly with a good layering system in place.

I have a couple of cookers, the Classic Trangia is silent and just works...no moving parts. I have a Primus Omnifuel which will run on gas/petrol/diesel/paraffin and work at sub zero temps but they burn loudly (LW, dump the Camping Gaz stove, it runs on Butane and at temps of 5c or lower just stop working).
 

The Boogie Man

Quite Addicted
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I think my kit would look after me. You can buy kit on a low budget and some of it works well but IMHO some key bits of kit are worth splashing out on. I'm happy with a Bergen pack and side pouches as it 'fits' me well and don't cost a lot. I have a few sleeping bags, some down, some synthetic but all well made and expensive and all perform well. Army Goretex bivvy bags are cheap enough but well made and do a grand job (and add a season to your sleeping bag). I've a 20+ year old down jacket which cost me a lot at the time but has served me well in very cold conditions but that said you can pick up an army 'softie' jacket which is synthetic but works extremely certainly with a good layering system in place.

I have a couple of cookers, the Classic Trangia is silent and just works...no moving parts. I have a Primus Omnifuel which will run on gas/petrol/diesel/paraffin and work at sub zero temps but they burn loudly (LW, dump the Camping Gaz stove, it runs on Butane and at temps of 5c or lower just stop working).
I have an ex Army jacket, was told it was a "tankers jacket", it's soft, Green, and quite padded, waist length. It's very warm. I used to have one of those Army sleeping bags with the arms built it, it was heavy as hell, waterproof though.
 

lonewolf

Neo Luddite Prepared Survivalist.
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(LW, dump the Camping Gaz stove, it runs on Butane and at temps of 5c or lower just stop working).
never had any trouble with the Gaz stove Harry in all the years I've been using them(about 30 years), I don't want to carry petrol
or other liquids in case it leaks in my pack- with my luck it probably would- and open fires are banned on Dartmoor.
 

lonewolf

Neo Luddite Prepared Survivalist.
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never had any problem with the GAZ cylinders so far. why change something that works.
 
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In the end it just comes down to what you prefer to use, I was just putting some more options out there.
Does a rocket stove count as an open fire to the national park authorities?
 

Harry Palmer

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LW, you must have camped in warmer months, butane just starts to stop working when it get to +5c or lower...that physics for you. If you using gas then get a stove which uses the screw on tins which are a mix of butane and propane; there is a winter mix which have butane, propane and another gas (can't remember the name). If you get one with a hose you can turn the gas tin upside down in cold weather which boosts performance.

I carry liquid fuel in Trangia fuel bottles which have a safety pourer and are bomb proof, no spills and they come in different sizes

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/BULIN-BL100-T4-A-Outdoor-Camping-Picnic-Foldable-Split-Gas-Stove-Burner/282556606302?ssPageName=STRK:MEBIDX:IT&_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649 This will take the screw on cannisters and note the 'pre heat' tube over the burner which heats the gas before it hits the burner.

I am a Trangia fan...they just work.
 

lonewolf

Neo Luddite Prepared Survivalist.
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7,964
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spring, summer and autumn camping, never done much winter camping (not sure I want to camp on the moors in winter!) although I've done day camps on Dartmoor in the winter.
have used the camping gaz bottles for the last 30 odd years without any problems.
having said that, I have a couple of the old pierceable cartridges left, when I've used those up I will probably go over to the screw/resealable type, just because they are easier to use.
 
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