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Fire lighting in damp conditions

G1ZmO

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I'm sure every one of us has had problems getting a fire going in damp conditions. I certainly have had my share of fails.

I came across Paul Kirtley's blog post on this and it's worth a read.
 

1 shot willie

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Never leave home without "Fire Biscuits" they are a great back up if all else fails you :thumbsup:
No shame in having a helping hand in an emergency or difficult situation......and could save the day.....and you :)
 
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Never leave home without "Fire Biscuits" they are a great back up if all else fails you :thumbsup:
No shame in having a helping hand in an emergency or difficult situation......and could save the day.....and you :)
I've got my wee 'fire kit' in a waterproof container which has a small ferro rod, weatherproof matches, fire biscuits, tampons, a small extendable blowing tube, birthday candles that don't blow out and a spare lighter. I've probably forgotten stuff too.
 

Joecole

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For me it's a couple of fire lighters a few wax biscuits and some vaseline soaked makeup removal pads. The important thing though is fuel in wet conditions. Take a good knife a baton and a wet 3 inch diameter log. The outer surface of the log might be wet but the inside will usually be dry. Yes a bit of work splitting the logs but once the fire is well established you can dry out the bits you've batoned off
 

Harry Palmer

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Couple of the smaller firelighters work fine. To be honest I can take or leave open fires, I rely on good tent, the right clothing/sleeping bag and a stove; I think of fires as a little luxury but not essential
 
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Ferro rod. Lighter. Blocks of wood from a small jenga game. Zippo. It’s probably time I upgraded my fire lighting kit. Maybe add flint and steel also and master that!.

A really need to get the finger out and master the bow drill and the other primitive ways of lightning a fire.
 
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Couple of the smaller firelighters work fine. To be honest I can take or leave open fires, I rely on good tent, the right clothing/sleeping bag and a stove; I think of fires as a little luxury but not essential
Totally agree with the 'luxury' angle, generally when I'm out, its not going to keep me alive (if I'm having one) but its that 'optional extra' that gives you a wee heat and a focus, its something to keep you occupied too. Its a fun thing unless you're relying on cooking on it.
 

Joecole

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Ferro rod. Lighter. Blocks of wood from a small jenga game. Zippo. It’s probably time I upgraded my fire lighting kit. Maybe add flint and steel also and master that!.

A really need to get the finger out and master the bow drill and the other primitive ways of lightning a fire.
The flint and steel are good fun to use Mark mine along with char cloth fits easily in a tobacco tin with room to spare for other bits a pieces
 

38thfoot

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Big fan of Paul Kirtley; tend to listen to his podcasts when driving. If you are planning on using an open fire to cook then a couple of tip I’ve gathered/learnt/been given were as follows:

1. Don't forget the prep for the next mornings fire; last thing to do is effectively bake the mornings kindling/firewood so it is bone dry and easier to light; can then be covered up ready to light with less delay/fuss when you want that morning brew.

2. A small nightlight/ candle can be used to heat the centre of the fire bundle.

3. Bury your evenings fire with earth/turf which keeps it dry but stops the oxygen flow; it will be easy to relight in the morning. (The swallows and amazons taught me this).

4. As others have said a small kit of tinder or something to provide a core to the fire be that fire biscuits, fire lighters, strips of rubber inner tube, a hexagon block or some Doritos (look it up)

38
 

Joecole

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Big fan of Paul Kirtley; tend to listen to his podcasts when driving. If you are planning on using an open fire to cook then a couple of tip I’ve gathered/learnt/been given were as follows:

1. Don't forget the prep for the next mornings fire; last thing to do is effectively bake the mornings kindling/firewood so it is bone dry and easier to light; can then be covered up ready to light with less delay/fuss when you want that morning brew.

2. A small nightlight/ candle can be used to heat the centre of the fire bundle.

3. Bury your evenings fire with earth/turf which keeps it dry but stops the oxygen flow; it will be easy to relight in the morning. (The swallows and amazons taught me this).

4. As others have said a small kit of tinder or something to provide a core to the fire be that fire biscuits, fire lighters, strips of rubber inner tube, a hexagon block or some Doritos (look it up)

38
All very good info there
 

Joecole

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Made the mistake of not prepping my wood for the morning fire a good few times.... couple of times out of sheer laziness right enough :D
well there's a good lesson learned Mark :)
 

Joecole

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Couple of the smaller firelighters work fine. To be honest I can take or leave open fires, I rely on good tent, the right clothing/sleeping bag and a stove; I think of fires as a little luxury but not essential
I agree up to a point Harry but personally I do like the comfort that a crackling log fire gives you at night when enjoying a last beer or a drop of scotch before bed time. Or in Paul's case a drop of rum
 

Joecole

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Knew I'd have forgotten something, I've also got some char cloth in my fire kit. I find denim works well for making it.
Denim is probably one of the better materials Bam, seem to hold the ember for a bit longer
 

Harry Palmer

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I'll let you into a secret, I HATE with a vengeance my nice expensive kit/tent etc stinking of wood smoke detest the lingering smell on the items. Not so bad with a wood burner stove in a tent. If I'm out with people who I know will insist on a fire then out comes me cheapo knock about stuff, army gear, jeans etc. I like the smell at the time, lovely but I always end up washing everything from clothes to goretex jacket as soon as I get home :(
 
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