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Hi all

Erbswurst

Very Addicted
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It's just an option for relatively windy conditions at the sea.

No hurry to buy it. They sell it since several years and will continue that.

In my opinion a tarp isn't only nicer in most conditions. It is far lighter than a normal tent. Less weight in the ruck sack means more comfort when hiking.

I am a pretty strong guy but as you know I count every gram, before I put stuff in my ruck sack.
 

Ystranc

Moderator
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On the tarp/tent debate, one thing to consider is midgies, tents win hands down in midgie season. Assuming you're camping where its an issue of course.
Spoken like a true Scotsman....midges the size of sparrows the last time I was up there, they're out early this year as well!
 

La Cucaracha

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Thanks for all the advice, i was doing ok until hammocks were mentioned now i think my head is going to explode with possibility overload!! Lol.
I think iam going to go bivvy and tarp, the whole being close to nature is my inner hippy coming out, ohmme....
Over time iam sure i will try everything and stick what doesn't suit in ebay.
 

Bam

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Thanks for all the advice, i was doing ok until hammocks were mentioned now i think my head is going to explode with possibility overload!! Lol.
I think iam going to go bivvy and tarp, the whole being close to nature is my inner hippy coming out, ohmme....
Over time iam sure i will try everything and stick what doesn't suit in ebay.
Half the fun is trying out different kit, you find what works for YOU. Here and youtube (natch) can be great for inspiration although its easy (especially after a couple of drinkipoos :whistle:) to buy extra stuff on a whim. As long as you're enjoying the whole thing then its all good. :)
 

Erbswurst

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It really depends on what you exactly want to do and in which conditions.

It is a difference if you want to go out alone, with a child, with your brother or your girl friend, or a small group. For all that are existing different good solutions, and for the most are existing optimal versions too.

Than it depends on, if you want to hike long distances, or mainly stay at one spot.
Or both or both in different tours.

Animals and ground, wind and weather are quiet different.

I develloped an equipment that is very versatile, and I can adept it to every conditions. But here or there it becomes more or less comfortable.

Other set ups are in some conditions more comfortable but do not work in other conditions.
Large Tarp and wind at the coast line can produce problems, hammocking where are no trees can become very difficult. Some tents you can't carry in a lot of areas over long distances, in some areas it's far easier to find a place for the hammock than for a tent or even a bivvy bag!

There are a lot of equipments which work nice in special conditions but not in others, and there are universal equipments that work fine in most conditions, but not every where, and than you have for example my standard equipment, that works everywhere, but it is by far not so comfortable like some equipments that are specialised for only a few situations.

The best is to have a very light poncho tarp and bivvy bag equipment like me, and a few additional modular parts, that extend the comfort in several directions for the main situations.

Some specialists like me inherited stuff from others and collected theyr whole life.
I usually do all and everything with the same very small rucksack and the same few cheap stuff. But I could fit out immidiatly 30 persons for a long distance hike and a high comfort summer camp.
Inclusive portable large tent where all could sit in together.

Yes, I own a boy scout camp. Only the boy scouts are missing currently.

And I am surely not alone with that. A lot of people could easily fit out fife others.
 

Erbswurst

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I am not finished with my thread about beginners equipment, but I am more or less finished with my answer to your question about the budget clothing I recommend.

I guess, that you have some T-shirts, swimming breefs and underwear and a thicker cotton shirt in your wardrobe, so the amount of money you really have to invest now shouldn't be so high.

Do you just own some bushcraft equipment like a Rucksack, a Swiss army knife, an old little camping pot, a small torch or head torch, a 600 g hatchet, a folding saw, a compass or whatever?

In some cases I would recommend you to buy equipment from other sources, if you have nothing, but if you have this and that, I would recommend you additional to it some cheap but good Decathlon stuff I didn't write about.

Just give me a list of the stuff you just have, so that I can think about how to complete it for the beginning in the cheapest way.
Throw your stuff on the kitchen scales and write in the list the exact weight of every piece!

You could show me some photos of your stuff, you just take the picture with your smart phone, visit the forum by using it and press the "Paper clip -Attach files" button, under the text you write, so you easily can integrate them.

Usually a man of your age should be able to find enough stuff in his wardrobe, kitchen, shed, attic and cave to go in the bush without buying anything special.

You just habe to think about it!

The clothing I recommended to you is good.

But regarding the other equipment I recommend you to use, what you have and invest in quality equipment step by step. That's better than buying every thing cheap.

Some parts could be bought very cheap, as throw away articles, to concentrate your current budget in a few good things.

Because less is more if we go hiking, there isn't so much stuff you really need to buy.

The cheapest and lightest equipment is the equipment, that stays in the shop!

What do you work exactly?
Do you build attics or do you make furniture and have every tool for that?

A lot of equipment a carpenter can make in his workshop faster than he can find and order it in the internet!
 

Erbswurst

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Have a look to this thread here!

That is a beginners outfit too.
The listed equipment is nearly complete.
More isn't really necessary in the summer.

Here I wrote a very short list, because children can't carry more.

But of course we can use such a short packing list too, if we want to save money!

And if we carry only a few things with us, it doesn't really matter, if some things are not lightweight trekking stuff, because it's made for example to use it in the kitchen at home.

All together that can be lighter in the end than a very long list of very light and very expensive stuff.



That all are children's sizes! I just mean, that you should understand, how short a packing list can be.


 

Bam

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Brilliant, get out there and try it. You'll see for yourself what works for you and what you would do differently. I don't see a First aid kit, don't know if your oppo is taking one but it's one of those things that it's best to have and not need than the other way round.

As you go, you'll refine what you take, you could line 10 of us up for a show and tell and we'll all swear by different kit.
 

Matt

Administrator
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Hey erbswurst i mistakenly made a whole new thread instead of replying on this thread! The info of what iam taking is in thread my first night out
hi mate i moved the post,s as this section of the forum is for saying hello ..... thought it was best to start you a new thread to carry this convo on ok :)👍
 
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