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How do I restore two misery whips?

Woodlander

Site Manager
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Hi folks got these two old crosscut saws yesterday.
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If my handsaw has surface rust, I use oil and 1200 grit abrasive paper, then graphite spray oil once finished. These are a bit further gone as they have spent 40 years on the wall in a leaky old railway carriage, and I think they need a bit more care than that.
Not totally rotten, but very rusted and pitted, couple of teeth are broken.
I know how to file and set teeth on old bowsaws and antique handsaws, can only presume its the same process but need to know the angles?
Any and all advice appreciated, as have never restored metal to this extent before
 
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I'd look at the set/grind angle of the teeth close to the ends of the saw where they've had less wear and use that as a starting point, you can always increase the angle slightly if you find that the saw binds when you first use it but if you overdo the angle it will mean that the saw will be removing more wood than necessary at each stroke and that is just going to make it heavier work to use.
Nice bucking saws are always worth having.
 

Joecole

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@Ystranc Thanks mate:thumbsup:
What about the rust? Wire brush in an angle grinder or a more gentle approach?
Use a rotary brush on your drill to remove most of the rust Jon then wet and dry with a wooden block starting with course and working your way down. Wet and dry but using WD40 not water
 
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I would use a cup brush on an angle grinder but stay away from the teeth. I doubt you'd affect the temper but you would chew up your cup brush. Keep the brush moving and you won't overheat the metal, it should give a burnished finish.
 
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