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Icelandic volcanic activity

Keith 66

Quite Talkative
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360
#1
Quite a lot of people worrying about Yellowstone & plenty of vids on youtube some downright scaremongering.
Few years back i started following the Icelandic meterolgical service earthquake page, surprising number of earthquakes on a daily basis & regular swarms. I think we are far more likely to get a big eruption or series of them there that could do a lot of us no good!
Some interesting sites, Whole Country, Also Jon Frimans blog is extremely informative & he writes regular articles on the ongoing activity there, Iceland geology | Volcano and earthquake activity in Iceland, Bit closer to home than yellowstone!
 

Keith 66

Quite Talkative
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27
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28
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360
#7
Sobering article. I read somewhere that the haze from Sulphur dioxide pollution reached as far south as southern England & was a leading cause of the French revolution.
If & when a similar episode happens again it will be catastrophic.
 

The Boogie Man

Moderator
Staff member
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577
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710
#8
Sobering article. I read somewhere that the haze from Sulphur dioxide pollution reached as far south as southern England & was a leading cause of the French revolution.
If & when a similar episode happens again it will be catastrophic.
Correct, the eruption led to failed harvests all over Europe and severe social problems. The effect on livestock in the area as far south as Orkney and North Scotland are not often mentioned, but reports show both people and animals dying of breathing problems due to Sulphur Dioxide fallout.
I think this might be a reasonable scenario for a what if. It's certainly not too far fetched a prospect. Perhaps we should look into it in more detail?
 

Joecole

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#9
Correct, the eruption led to failed harvests all over Europe and severe social problems. The effect on livestock in the area as far south as Orkney and North Scotland are not often mentioned, but reports show both people and animals dying of breathing problems due to Sulphur Dioxide fallout.
I think this might be a reasonable scenario for a what if. It's certainly not too far fetched a prospect. Perhaps we should look into it in more detail?
Yes it my be worth a closer study, It makes me glad that I live way down South. Believe it or not our biggest natural threat in this area is earth quakes and Kent gets its fare share of minor tremors
 

Keith 66

Quite Talkative
Messages
27
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Points
360
#10
The 2014 Holruhaun eruption was relatively small by Icelandic standards but ran for 9 months. In that time it was emitting approx 50,000 tons of So2 a day. When you think that the entire annual output of So2 from all Europes power stations, cars & industry is approx 70,000 tons a year it puts things into perspective. Apart from a brief flurry of interest from the media in the first week there was no further news follow up because it did not disrupt air travel!
And yet climate wise it was quite far reaching.
The Holruhaun eruption was a fissure eruption driven by the slow collapse of the Bardabunga volcano caldera.
Jon Frimans blog is worth following as there is much good info on what is actually happening out there.
Though it is quiet at the moment many scientists think that there will be a big eruption before long.
I recently found this site which is a 3d live earthquake map of Iceland, it takes a bit of getting used to but is quite fascinating, Advanced3dBulge,
 

The Boogie Man

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#11
Yes it my be worth a closer study, It makes me glad that I live way down South. Believe it or not our biggest natural threat in this area is earth quakes and Kent gets its fare share of minor tremors
The Sulphur Dioxide levels might be high enough to have an effect on the whole of Northern Europe Joe, depending on which Volcano erupts. If Laki goes up it has the capability to destroy crops for a couple of years and lower the temperatures low enough for snow in June. I'm not sure given these events how things would play out. For example me & you are both Gardeners who enjoy raising some food for ourselves and family, could you imagine temperatures low enough for snow in June and what that would do to our crops, straight away I would say it will kill most of the Potato crop, stuff like Toms would have no chance. Food for thought isn't it?
 
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Keith 66

Quite Talkative
Messages
27
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28
Points
360
#12
Here's a link to the earlier Fires of Eldgja, The Eldgja Eruption: Iceland’s Baptism by Fire | VolcanoCafe, Interesting that there have been 14 fissure eruptions over the last 1200 years. Maybe we are due another big one before too long. With our just in time supply chain & reliance on supermarkets road travel i suspect our society would be in deep trouble. A lot of people would get hungry very quickly. Dont i sound like a miserable sod!
 

The Boogie Man

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#13
I have no doubt the event would cause massive trouble but in some ways our systems can react quickly and more efficiently than previous eras. When in earlier times the speed of relief was the speed of a good Horse things moved at that level, now we can move supplies around the Globe very easily. We can assume the pollutants will be bad enough to ground all aircraft, so they can be ruled out, but we still have Maritime assets that could move food supplies from other areas. But it won't be a bed of Roses either.