• Welcome to Life In The Wilderness

    You are currently viewing the site as a guest and some content may not be available to you.

    Registration is quick and easy and will give you full access to the site and allow you to ask questions or make comments and join in on the conversation. If you would like to join then please Register

Keith

Very Addicted
Messages
1,630
Points
780
Age
72
If you do not want to be on any gun register, then purchasing an antique gun is the legal answer. New laws are being introduced to the UK regarding antique cartridge guns, but as far as I know, no changes involve muzzle-loading firearms.

http://library.college.police.uk/docs/appref/Gun_crime_Antique_firearms_final.pdf

http://www.gunmart.net/militaria/antique-weapons/antique-guns/antique-arms-collecting-and-the-law

Some non cartridge firing antique guns can be purchased for under one thousand pounds, some are only a few hundred pounds.
https://www.gunstar.co.uk/Antique-Guns/O/All-Guns-for-sale

http://www.jcmilitaria.com/antique_weapons_pistols.asp?Start=80&Offset=10

http://www.andrewbottomley.com/antique-pistols-and-revolvers-8-c.asp

http://www.rustyoldarms.co.uk/flintlocks/page-4/

I recommend looking for a flintlock rather than a percussion for the simple reason that a flintlock will be easier to maintain post shtf.
Keith.
 

lonewolf

Neo Luddite Prepared Survivalist.
Messages
7,964
Points
1,180
I wonder what the laws are about ammunition for antique guns, I am under the impression that even the black powder guns used by The Sealed Knot have to be licenced.
 

greenbear

Extremely Addicted
Messages
2,581
Points
960
I wonder what the laws are about ammunition for antique guns, I am under the impression that even the black powder guns used by The Sealed Knot have to be licenced.

A few years back my cousin was in the sealed knot and had a replica musket. She had to have a licence for it (I always thought it ironic that she was a judge and sent murderers down but pretended to shoot people at the weekend - but we all need a hobby ;) ).

Keith will know best but, I think, it might have been a "black powder" licence or some such.
 

lonewolf

Neo Luddite Prepared Survivalist.
Messages
7,964
Points
1,180
might be different rules in Australia to the UK.
wife knew a few sealed knot in her time and yes she has just confirmed a black powder licence is needed.
 

Ystranc

Moderator
Messages
5,880
Points
1,350
You can own a long antique muzzle loader or a pistol without a licence however you need a licence in order to discharge it or keep it in conjunction with powder and shot
You can also own obsolete caliber Center Fire cartridge firearms (a list is circulated by the home office) without deactivating them or holding a licence
If you want to own an antique black powder pistol with the intention of discharging it you must additionally be a member of a registered gun club or society such as the sealed knot
 

Keith

Very Addicted
Messages
1,630
Points
780
Age
72
I wonder what the laws are about ammunition for antique guns, I am under the impression that even the black powder guns used by The Sealed Knot have to be licenced.
You only need to licence an antique if you intend to actually use it/fire it. But if you use a smoothbore you should be able to purchase lead shot okay or you can make your own. You can also make your own black powder.
This is only for use post shtf of course.
Keith.
 

Keith

Very Addicted
Messages
1,630
Points
780
Age
72
A few years back my cousin was in the sealed knot and had a replica musket. She had to have a licence for it (I always thought it ironic that she was a judge and sent murderers down but pretended to shoot people at the weekend - but we all need a hobby ;) ).

Keith will know best but, I think, it might have been a "black powder" licence or some such.
I think it is the same in the UK as it is here. If you intend to actually use the gun, then you need a firearms licence. I don't think it is a special licence. But this of course would involve regular firearms checks which some people want to avoid. Providing you don't intend to use the antique muzzle-loading gun, then you do not need a licence. BUT, if black powder were discovered at your house by the police, then they would assume that you do intend to use the gun & therefore you have broken the law. As this is only intended for use post shtf, I would suggest perhaps keeping the potassium nitrate & sulphur in the garden shed until needed or just keep it out of sight somewhere. If it is not made into black powder then you have not broken any law, & after there is no law it won't matter.
I don't like the firearms checks, but for me it is something I have to put up with. The police are ignorant when it comes to types of firearms so it can be a problem, plus I never trust them & do NOT leave them alone in my house! I video the firearms check so that I have a visual & audio record of what goes on.
Keith.
 

Keith

Very Addicted
Messages
1,630
Points
780
Age
72
You can own a long antique muzzle loader or a pistol without a licence however you need a licence in order to discharge it or keep it in conjunction with powder and shot
You can also own obsolete caliber Center Fire cartridge firearms (a list is circulated by the home office) without deactivating them or holding a licence
If you want to own an antique black powder pistol with the intention of discharging it you must additionally be a member of a registered gun club or society such as the sealed knot
The laws on cartridge antique guns/revolvers is changing so you need to check that out. I think there is some info at the links I provided.
Keith.
 

Ystranc

Moderator
Messages
5,880
Points
1,350
There have been some issues in the UK where Italian made .44 Colt replica pistols have been mis-used in acts of crime. Since the cylinders of these percussion firearms can be dropped out and interchanged with another freshly loaded cylinder they can in fact be reloaded as fast as a modern hand gun. The fact that these guns use obsolete technology has been used to circumvent the law without really sticking to the spirit of the law. This has left a few people at the home office with their knickers a bit bunched up.
It's unlikely to effect muzzle loaders.
 

Keith

Very Addicted
Messages
1,630
Points
780
Age
72
There have been some issues in the UK where Italian made .44 Colt replica pistols have been mis-used in acts of crime. Since the cylinders of these percussion firearms can be dropped out and interchanged with another freshly loaded cylinder they can in fact be reloaded as fast as a modern hand gun. The fact that these guns use obsolete technology has been used to circumvent the law without really sticking to the spirit of the law. This has left a few people at the home office with their knickers a bit bunched up.
It's unlikely to effect muzzle loaders.
The main problem the UK police claim is criminals using antique cartridge revolvers. I think they must resize the cylinders to take modern ammo.
Keith.
 
Top