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Kilaeua Eruption / Hilina Slump

Keith 66

Slightly Talkative
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300
#1
Following on from Boogie mans thread, I found this vid on you tube,
, Unlike many this is backed up with references in description box to reputable science sites. If the Hilina slump drops into the deep ocean it will be apocalyptic. The news & media are focusing on the volcanic fissures but not on the potential disaster. Probably for obvious reasons. If it went your only option if you lived in the tsunami zones would be to get in a boat & run for deep water & try to ride the waves.
 

The Boogie Man

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710
#3
I'm checking the Hawaii GS regularly, they are concerned the Lava in the main vent is going to drop below Sea level. If that happens the water will rush in and cause a Steam eruption.
 

Keith 66

Slightly Talkative
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#4
I saw yesterday that the Kilaeua main vent is approx 4000ft above sea level, scientists reckon the lava level has dropped nearly 1000 feet so its still a long way above sea level, think they are more worried about interaction of groundwater getting into the vent, but yes steam explosions would be a very bad thing to happen, the interesting thing is the erupting fissures are in a pretty straight line along the inner edge of the hilina slump. Does not bear thinking about what might happen.
 

The Boogie Man

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#6
I saw yesterday that the Kilaeua main vent is approx 4000ft above sea level, scientists reckon the lava level has dropped nearly 1000 feet so its still a long way above sea level, think they are more worried about interaction of groundwater getting into the vent, but yes steam explosions would be a very bad thing to happen, the interesting thing is the erupting fissures are in a pretty straight line along the inner edge of the hilina slump. Does not bear thinking about what might happen.
YES--ground water...thanks for pointing that out:thumbsup: A lot of people don't realise that the Big island is only the top of a huge undersea mountain.
 

Keith 66

Slightly Talkative
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#7
There have been at least 17 identified underwater landslides in the Hawaian islands going back many millions of years so its nothing new.
The largest landslide, dubbed the "Nuuanu debris avalanche," extends 140 miles out to sea from Windward O‘ahu.
In the middle of it, 60 miles northeast of Nuuanu Pali, is Tuscaloosa Seamount: 19 miles long, 11 miles wide and more than a mile thick. This single rock, with a volume of 230 cubic miles, was once part of O‘ahu.
Now that would have generated a wave or two.