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Keith

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After WW2 in America, some people started gathering together to hold shoots using muzzle-loading guns. Mostly these were originals dating back to the French & Indian war, the American Revolution, & the American Civil War. As time past, these people had the idea of dressing in the period clothes to fit the era of those guns, & eventually it went even further with these people collecting all sorts of period gear & they started holding Rendezvous that simulated the Fur Trade Rendezvous that took place in the Rocky mountains between 1825 & 1840. This era of the Rocky Mountains fur trappers lasted just 25 years, until the price of beaver fell.
Now some say that this all started because these people wanted to get back to a time when life was more simple & basic, but I believe that it all started after the depression era. During the depression jobs were few & money was short. Many took to hunting in order to feed their families. However, ammunition for modern guns was in short supply, & what was available was extremely expensive. It was then that many people turned to the guns that had been owned by their grandparents & great grandparents, the flintlock muzzle-loading guns. Black Powder could be made, & there is also some records showing that black powder was found by some people along with these guns, stored in attics & garden sheds.
We could as yet be faced with a similar post war depression, & there are several scenarios that could be it's cause. The difference now of course is that many of us in England & Australia do not have these old muzzle-loading guns to fall back on. Those of us who do are lucky, & there are many people who are members of 18th century living history groups worldwide who are using modern replica muzzle-loading guns & rifles. But these old guns are not the only tools available to us, there are also the traditional bows, & crossbows, plus air rifles. These for the most part are a sustainable resource.
One other story from the depression years comes to mind, a young American Indian boy kept his family fed by hunting with his tomahawk. Later on after the depression this boy became famous for his on stage tomahawk throwing act.
Do not dismiss these primitive tools in favour of a modern firearm, unless you can store a great amount of ammunition & you have the ability to keep your modern gun functioning.
Keith.
Crusoe_Sepia_004.jpg
 

greenbear

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I am quite a strong believer in the past having real currency in the present day. Many skills are centuries old and are still practised.

Incidentally, Keith, I see your pistol is a left hand lock - rare survivor :) Do you know anything of the history of it?
 

lonewolf

Neo Luddite Prepared Survivalist.
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I am quite a strong believer in the past having real currency in the present day. Many skills are centuries old and are still practised.
many are yes, but by very few in number- compared to the rest of the population.
I try and learn one new skill every year, I did one course in 2015, I did a green woodworking course this year, I wonder what I can find for 2017??:)
 

Keith

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I am quite a strong believer in the past having real currency in the present day. Many skills are centuries old and are still practised.

Incidentally, Keith, I see your pistol is a left hand lock - rare survivor :) Do you know anything of the history of it?
I have no information on this pistol at all Brownbear. I judge it to be French by design, but there is no maker's name. It is very similar to one made by Duval a Nantes.
 

greenbear

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It is a really interesting piece - the lock does have a rather "French" look to it. I have occasionally seen left handed locks on fowling pieces, but only once before on a pistol (long barrelled horse pistol, part of a pair, so logic in having a left and right handed lock set) :)
 

Keith

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It is a really interesting piece - the lock does have a rather "French" look to it. I have occasionally seen left handed locks on fowling pieces, but only once before on a pistol (long barrelled horse pistol, part of a pair, so logic in having a left and right handed lock set) :)
Personally I can not see any difference in use between one or the other, except perhaps in priming. The traditional method of priming is to use the main powder horn, there were no priming horns in the 18th century. I like the left hand lock because I carry it on the right front under the belt with the lock facing outward, my hunting knife is on my left front. I can shoot left or right handed, but prefer to use my right hand.
Keith.

 

lonewolf

Neo Luddite Prepared Survivalist.
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"those that fail to learn the lessons of the past are destined to repeat them!":p
 

greenbear

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Whichever side the lock is on determines safety, so a right handed person would prefer a right hand side lock, so that during priming a premature ignition (flash in the pan) would be directed away from the users face and also when shooting, again the blast on the pan is directed outward :)
 
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