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Metal File Recommendation

David Day

Slightly Addicted
Messages
270
Points
480
Age
35
Hiya All,

I’ve 'acquired' many files over the years but most of them were close to the end of their functional life when they came to me and I've never actually bought one first hand!
(I do have a surplus of wooden handles because of this!!)
There are literally a million on ebay but I have a feeling that a large proportion are poor quality tat so could do with some guidance...

Can anyone recommend a decent metal file to get me started and possibly a file card to keep it in good condition?


Cheers!
 

Ystranc

Moderator
Messages
3,331
Points
1,110
Also depends on what material you're filing. I'm a big fan of using the right tool for the job.
 

Ark79

Site Manager
Staff member
Messages
11,537
Points
1,430
A would go for the Nicholson. Used one on my old axe and my mates....a believe there called old bastured files lol... a think most files would do the same job to be honest.... but recently I’ve adopted the frame of mind.. the right tool for the job :)
 

Ystranc

Moderator
Messages
3,331
Points
1,110
Bastard refers to the fact that the file has quite a course cut. Since the bit of an axe is hardened I would use a couple of different cuts or you'll spend weeks grinding out the file marks from a bastard cut file.
They go from coarse, bastard, 2nd cut, smooth and dead smooth.
I'm this instance I'd use bastard then 2nd cut and then smooth before switching to a grindstone. It will be faster and get a better finish.
 

Ark79

Site Manager
Staff member
Messages
11,537
Points
1,430
Bastard refers to the fact that the file has quite a course cut. Since the bit of an axe is hardened I would use a couple of different cuts or you'll spend weeks grinding out the file marks from a bastard cut file.
They go from coarse, bastard, 2nd cut, smooth and dead smooth.
I'm this instance I'd use bastard then 2nd cut and then smooth before switching to a grindstone. It will be faster and get a better finish.



Always wondered why they was called bastard files.
(Thread drift ) The first knife I tried to make was from such a file. Man it was hard. Couldn’t get a drill bit through it lol. Should have fired it first lol.
 

Ystranc

Moderator
Messages
3,331
Points
1,110
It takes some doing to get even a small piece of steel white hot enough to work it properly. I used a heat gun blowing onto charcoal in my shed woodturning stove but I made sure to line it with firebricks first.
 
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