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Mini woodstove for long term shelter

Woodlander

Quite Addicted
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Hi all started a new project as the last one went awry. Using a 7 kg gas bottle rescued from a skip. Done the door so far. Used a heavy duty fire door hinge. Trying to source a pipe for the flue outlet. Got some 15mm x15mm box section to make the grate. Designing a valve for the air intake. Out of cutting discs and welding rods so on stop till they arrive. But at least it's a start
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Joecole

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Staff member
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73
Hi all started a new project as the last one went awry. Using a 7 kg gas bottle rescued from a skip. Done the door so far. Used a heavy duty fire door hinge. Trying to source a pipe for the flue outlet. Got some 15mm x15mm box section to make the grate. Designing a valve for the air intake. Out of cutting discs and welding rods so on stop till they arrive. But at least it's a startView attachment 15279
View attachment 15280
Keep the pics coming Jon
 

Ystranc

Moderator
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2,523
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980
I enclose a few pictures of my shed stove, hope it helps with the design process. The drawer at the bottom is both ash can and air inlet adjustment but this stove could also be improved with a butterfly valve in the flu to reduce its draught a little once it's got going. It's good enough to boil a kettle or use as a hot plate. The hinges, door and latch are just made from strips of the off cuts... The top is just flat steel plate with a ring welded to it to locate the flu.
 

Attachments

Ystranc

Moderator
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Points
980
Ignore the stack of fire bricks on top, they're not necessary. I only use them to line the inside of the fire when I'm using it as a forge with blown air and charcoal.
 

Ystranc

Moderator
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Points
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The first time you light a fire in something like this the paint will burn off with thick toxic smoke before you can wire brush it and give it a coating of stove black or similar.
 

Woodlander

Quite Addicted
Messages
591
Points
780
Age
35
I enclose a few pictures of my shed stove, hope it helps with the design process. The drawer at the bottom is both ash can and air inlet adjustment but this stove could also be improved with a butterfly valve in the flu to reduce its draught a little once it's got going. It's good enough to boil a kettle or use as a hot plate. The hinges, door and latch are just made from strips of the off cuts... The top is just flat steel plate with a ring welded to it to locate the flu.
That's smart. Thanks for the inspiration. Finished mine but keeping it for a van when we get one. Worried it might get nicked from down my woods so going to make a rocket stove for the shelter instead
 

Gazo

Very Addicted
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Age
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Mainly wood mate, I burn all my off cuts from the workshop as it's placed just outside. I did use charcoal when I heat treated the knife I made.
Yes I have had it glowing a few times does kick out a fair bit of heat.
I am going to build another as I have a bigger propane bottle.
 

Gazo

Very Addicted
Messages
1,568
Points
970
Age
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Multi use as well then......do you blow air up through the standing tube through the draught door entry and use it as a small forge?
Look forward to seeing the bigger one.
Yes mate my shop vac blows as well as sucks ;) you can see the pipe on the last picture above. Works well as a forge pushing forced air up from the bottom.
 
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