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New Axe / Axe sharpening ?

Stephen

Very Talkative
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83
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330
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25
Hey guys & gals,

Was in B&Q today looking for paint etc for the house and couldn’t help myself by going to look at the axes. Only £15 or so for this boys size axe. Ideas on how to get it scary sharp?

Yes that is a tiger paw slipper in the background xD
 

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Ark79

Site Manager
Staff member
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10,147
Points
1,430
Hey guys & gals,

Was in B&Q today looking for paint etc for the house and couldn’t help myself by going to look at the axes. Only £15 or so for this boys size axe. Ideas on how to get it scary sharp?

Yes that is a tiger paw slipper in the background xD


Tiger paw slippers? Am seeing you in a hole new light Stephen:rofl:

It’s not the price of the axe it’s how you swing it lol
 

Baytree

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100
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360
Age
55
My go to sharpening method is carborundum stone lubricated by turps . That's always worked with my edged tools and I have gotten an axe sharp enough to shave the hairs off my arm. That said , it was only done on a "because I can" basis as I really can't see the point in getting an axe that sharp , it isn't necessary or the tasks it gets put to.
 

saxonaxe

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122
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Well! I learn something every day..:D I've only ever used a round Puck and the result is usually err..sharpish, you can forget the cutting paper bit..:lol:
I shall try the flat stone method next time.
 

Baytree

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When learning to sharpen and learning I'd actually managed to get a tool really sharp the test we used was to cut wet paper . A sharp blade will cut paper but if there's any slight roughness to the edge it won't cut wet paper it will tear it.
 

Ystranc

Moderator
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I'm a firm believer that a sharper axe needs less effort making it a more efficient tool. The balance of an axe is also crucial whatever brand or price it is...an unbalanced axe transmits shock back to your wrist and takes more effort.
 

Harry Palmer

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" efficient tool " not really, better off with a saw and use the axe (or maul) for splitting.
 

Baytree

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Depends on what one does with an axe really. I keep my pretty sharp , about as sharp asa chisel , but then I use mine for shaping. Today for instance I used one to make some tent pegs , and to shape a trug ( kind off an oblong bowl type of thing) but I keep another axe for splitting that has a less keen edge. Though I keep my axes sharp I and many others can't see the point of an axe as sharp as a razor as we feel that they get to a point where they are sharp enough for what they are used for and the extra effort involved in getting it that sharp doesn't really seem worth it and of course a thinner edge is more prone to damage.
Agreed about the balance , a tool needs to feel right. Saying that many years ago I leant my wooden handled hammer to an apprentice who promptly broke it. After a bollocking I reshafted it using the original so it was obviously shorter. I fully intended to redo but 18 months later it was still a "stubby" little thing which is when I put a new full sized handle on it and to begin with the feel , the balance , the swing all felt off.
 

The Boogie Man

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I keep a set of small files for dressing any edge deformation, a set of Diamond stones for finer edge alignment and a small very fine oil stone for final honing. Edge wise it depends on the Blade. I keep my Axes sharp enough to cut paper cleanly but not too sharp as to have a weak edge. My MKII Khukri is kept razor sharp as are my field knives. Other blades like historical replicas are sharpened to fit the function of the blade. Sabres are sharpened differently to medieval Bastards swords for instance. Machetes, Parangs and Bolo's etc I feel benefit from a keen edge, but not so keen as to allow burring of the edge with heavy use.
 

Bopdude

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I sharpened my axe to paper cutting sharp with my DC4, granted it was new outta the box and just needed a titivating ;) but it works and as I always have my DC4 on my sheath it's handy.
 

Ystranc

Moderator
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" efficient tool " not really, better off with a saw and use the axe (or maul) for splitting.
Ok Harry, a saw is more efficient then an axe in most tasks...but what I actually wrote was that "I'm a firm believer that a sharper axe needs less effort making it a more efficient tool" in the context of a thread about sharpening a new axe. I get the impression that you missed my point somewhat.
 

Rathwulven BC

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I only got carbon steel blades at home. The tomahawk and hatchet are always sharpened with the Lansky puck. Worth the purchase, if you ask me. And gets the job done.
 

The Boogie Man

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It also surprises me the amount of folks who don't understand Oil stones and Wet stones actually need lubrication to work correctly. The angle and form of an edge is very important to the cutting efficiency of a blade, a poor edge alignment can make an excellent cutting blade into a poor chopper. Sharpening is one area of our pursuit that seems to cause a lot of problems for folks getting into this life, yet it remains a skill that is so central to us. It is one of the most basic skills needed in any field sport/farming/small holder, as well as keeping your household knives sharp, yet causes so many problems for the newcomer.
As with all things practice makes perfect and I recommend folks new to blades buy old knives etc and practice sharpening them before attempting to do it on more expensive blades. A little knowledge in this area is a bad thing, as if you mess up you can ruin a good blade very quickly.
 

The Boogie Man

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I only got carbon steel blades at home.
Good Carbon steel is the only Steel to use in my book, both for knives and Swords. Stainless Steel is rubbish IMO and only fit for "Wall Hangers" and Ebay fantasy knives. Stainless is lazy mans Metal, invented for mass production of cutlery. You need to look after Carbon Steel Blades as they will rust/oxidise very easily.
 

Rathwulven BC

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I would second that. There is nothing wrong with stainless in the sense that it, indeed, serves regular purposes on an everyday basis. But I would not go further than tools on a leatherman-scale with stainless.

Simply also because of the handshock. It became a thing amongst folks to buy these full-steel-type of hatchets. Then, after three hits, they wonder why their wrists hurt. Nothing beats the good ole hickory-handle with a high quality carbon steel.

 

The Boogie Man

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Hickory is a bloody good handle Wood, no doubting it. European Ash was popular for shafts because of it's good shock absorbing abilities. Ash was also used to make Arrow shafts and Shields.
 
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