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Plastic Waste And The Dangers It Poses

lonewolf

Neo Luddite Prepared Survivalist.
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well the first problem is we have a THROWAWAY society, we see it all the time in the countryside and on motorways, now its in the sea as well.
councils don't have joined up thinking, each council has a different system for dealing with plastic waste and no 2 are the same, people get cheesed off and they just don't bother.
I know of someone, a so called prepper, who said " i'm not being an unpaid recycling worker for the council , that's their job" and I think that attitude is widespread.
that's the first and main problem, peoples attitude to waste. to fix the problem of waste you have to alter peoples attitude to it, try to make them more eco aware. and that's not going to be easy.
 

greenbear

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I think it's a combination of things, the throwaway society is certainly a part of that problem, but one has to consider what difference there might be if the plastic that was thrown away was paper. Whilst there would be waste (and roadside litter) it would all have a reasonable lifespan within which to break down. I understand that it has been estimated that some forms of plastic waste could take up to 500 years to break down
 

lonewolf

Neo Luddite Prepared Survivalist.
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never had this trouble when we had glass bottles.
and why cant other stuff be sold in cardboard instead of plastic?
 

greenbear

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never had this trouble when we had glass bottles.
and why cant other stuff be sold in cardboard instead of plastic?
That is one of the key questions that is often asked. I do have some answers, particularly with glass bottles, they are simply heavier and take up more space, add that to plastic bottles being cheaper and it is easy to see why manufacturers changed to plastic.
 

lonewolf

Neo Luddite Prepared Survivalist.
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I suspect its down to cost at the end of the day.
wife recently bought some dishes made from wheat straw, unfortunately at the moment they are only available from China. hopefully that will change.
bought some laundry liquid some time ago in Tesco's that was in a cardboard container but that seems to be the extent of it in the UK.
 

Ystranc

Moderator
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The oceans were the cradle of life, now we're poisoning all the higher life in them.
A very important post BB, something we need to keep in the front of people's minds.
 

lonewolf

Neo Luddite Prepared Survivalist.
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we humans came from the sea originally, allegedly :lol:
 

lonewolf

Neo Luddite Prepared Survivalist.
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wont be for much longer, it'll be the dustbin of life if we keep polluting it with plastic.
 

Max Swain

Very Talkative
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200
We try to recycle our plastics, which goes in the ‘Pink Bag’ along with paper, tins, paper & tin foil....but, we have to check every single item we bin as we’ve found that some plastics can’t go with other bits.
Then after all that the refuse collectors arrive, collect the Pink Bags & Black Bags (general rubbish) & sometimes lob them into the same section of their lorries to be crushed. I’ve had neighbours say that they don’t use the recycling method as the rubbish isn’t sorted properly at point of collection just because the Council are sending 1 vehicle to collect all the rubbish.
 

lonewolf

Neo Luddite Prepared Survivalist.
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we can only recycle anything that looks like a bottle in our weekly recycling, they wont pick up anything different than that, the recycling is done at a run and they haven't got time to pick up anything they drop, so we find loads of tin lids lying around after the collection which nobody picks up so its left lying there for ever and a day(we pick up the ones nearest our house).
the rest has to be collected- by us- and stored in the summer house until we can do a special trip to the recycling centre- 26 miles there and back.
 

greenbear

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The oceans were the cradle of life, now we're poisoning all the higher life in them.
A very important post BB, something we need to keep in the front of people's minds.
We can discuss prepping, but it seems non-sensical to prep for a disaster we are making that can be averted. A SHTF situation is the last thing anyone actually wants...
 

lonewolf

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We can discuss prepping, but it seems non-sensical to prep for a disaster we are making that can be averted. A SHTF situation is the last thing anyone actually wants...
but can it be averted? hasn't it gone to far already? , now with China not accepting our recycling there will be more of it .
 

greenbear

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we can only recycle anything that looks like a bottle in our weekly recycling, they wont pick up anything different than that, the recycling is done at a run and they haven't got time to pick up anything they drop, so we find loads of tin lids lying around after the collection which nobody picks up so its left lying there for ever and a day(we pick up the ones nearest our house).
the rest has to be collected- by us- and stored in the summer house until we can do a special trip to the recycling centre- 26 miles there and back.
The best way to manage it, if you can, is by careful selection of packaging at source. For example opt for the glass rather than plastic bottle (glass being 100% recyclable). Buy meat from a butcher to avoid Styrofoam dishes and clingfilm wrap (for that matter use cellophane rather than clingfilm - it is made of wood). The list is endless, but you get the general idea I am sure.
 

lonewolf

Neo Luddite Prepared Survivalist.
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we do what we can, we buy our meat in the weekly market from a local supplier, eggs from a local producer up the road, we try to buy stuff loose if we can but some of it is inevitably in plastic-supermarket stuff- and that does mount up over a month.
 

greenbear

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we do what we can, we buy our meat in the weekly market from a local supplier, eggs from a local producer up the road, we try to buy stuff loose if we can but some of it is inevitably in plastic-supermarket stuff- and that does mount up over a month.
It does, but clearly you are taking a responsible approach reducing your plastic waste wherever possible LW. Without going to extreme lengths what you are currently doing is about the best anyone can hope to get in 21st century Britain, but it is well worthwhile and all credit to you for doing it.
 

lonewolf

Neo Luddite Prepared Survivalist.
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we reduce it where we can and then recycle it at the recycle centre once a month or when we have a car load, then come home and start the process all over again.
I wonder what it would take for companies/suppliers to NOT put stuff in plastic, its not just food its everything else as well, and does it HAVE to be shrink wrapped all the time??
 

greenbear

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It would take public pressure, the simplest form is, of course, the direct action of not buying products that come in plastic containers. It may cost the consumer a little more and may take some time but it really is that simple. If we stop buying a product, the manufacturers stop making it - remember, they're only after your money ;)
 
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