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Puma White Hunter

Bob N

Extremely Talkative
Messages
108
Points
560
Age
70
A ways back when I was a much younger man I fancied myself a big game hunter. I didn't marry until my late twenties and had a pretty decent job since I was 18, so money wasn't an obstacle. One day the local sporting goods store got in some new Puma knives and I just had to have the White Hunter, what an awesome knife. Went bear hunting with it in Ontario and deer hunting in NY. Turns out it was more knife than I ever really needed but it sure looked great on the hip. I haven't used it in a few decades until recently. I was checking it out on the internet and started reading user reviews. One guy uses it quite regularly splitting up kindling for use in his woodstove. I gave it a try and it's the perfect tool for the job. I can't believe the price those knives are going for these days. I paid $125.00 for mine in the early seventies which was a lot back then. I've seen some used ones around $300. Anyway It's nice to get some more use out of my initial investment.
 

Joecole

Quite Obsessed
Messages
14,836
Points
2,050
Age
76
A ways back when I was a much younger man I fancied myself a big game hunter. I didn't marry until my late twenties and had a pretty decent job since I was 18, so money wasn't an obstacle. One day the local sporting goods store got in some new Puma knives and I just had to have the White Hunter, what an awesome knife. Went bear hunting with it in Ontario and deer hunting in NY. Turns out it was more knife than I ever really needed but it sure looked great on the hip. I haven't used it in a few decades until recently. I was checking it out on the internet and started reading user reviews. One guy uses it quite regularly splitting up kindling for use in his woodstove. I gave it a try and it's the perfect tool for the job. I can't believe the price those knives are going for these days. I paid $125.00 for mine in the early seventies which was a lot back then. I've seen some used ones around $300. Anyway It's nice to get some more use out of my initial investment.
I had a White Hunter when I was in Aden back in the 60's until some scrote stole it, if you only had to choose one knife that would have to be the one. Trouble is you need to rake out a second mortgage to own one now
 

Bob N

Extremely Talkative
Messages
108
Points
560
Age
70
I keep it at my cabin upstate and unfortunately don't have pics saved to any devices here. This is a picture I found online of one that is closest to the one I have as far as stag handle coloring and sheath style/leather color. My knife is in a bit better shape as well. Next time up I'll take some images and post them here.
 

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Big Red

Quite Addicted
Messages
503
Points
900
I had a White Hunter when I was in Aden back in the 60's until some scrote stole it, if you only had to choose one knife that would have to be the one. Trouble is you need to rake out a second mortgage to own one now
I bet you would have loved to have had a “chat” with the scrote who had your White Hunter away Joe! 😡😡🤬👊👊🤛🤛
 

Bob N

Extremely Talkative
Messages
108
Points
560
Age
70
Hey Joe, after reading your comments I decided to look into what went on in Yemen in the sixties. I was in my early teens and unaware of conflicts other than the one in Vietnam.
Some of the reviews on the white hunter were from Vietnam War vets who chose to carry it as apposed to the standard issue blade. Many of the comments were of its ability to hack through underbrush.
Were they a common carry in Yemen? I know there isn't the same topography.
 

Joecole

Quite Obsessed
Messages
14,836
Points
2,050
Age
76
Hey Joe, after reading your comments I decided to look into what went on in Yemen in the sixties. I was in my early teens and unaware of conflicts other than the one in Vietnam.
Some of the reviews on the white hunter were from Vietnam War vets who chose to carry it as apposed to the standard issue blade. Many of the comments were of its ability to hack through underbrush.
Were they a common carry in Yemen? I know there isn't the same topography.
They weren't that common Bob apart from the boys in 45 commando port security force, one of the lads had a contact and several of us got them through him. They were a useful tool to carry when you were on the rigid raiders
 

Bob N

Extremely Talkative
Messages
108
Points
560
Age
70
"thought they were bigger like a Golok. £327.95 from Moonraker knives"

Because of the wide pronounced belly of the drop point blade it does give the appearance of being a much longer blade than it actually is, instead of being just six inches in length. I have read the design of the knife was so it could be used as a skinning and butchering tool for big game hunters.
It truly is a bad ass knife.
 

Joecole

Quite Obsessed
Messages
14,836
Points
2,050
Age
76
"thought they were bigger like a Golok. £327.95 from Moonraker knives"

Because of the wide pronounced belly of the drop point blade it does give the appearance of being a much longer blade than it actually is, instead of being just six inches in length. I have read the design of the knife was so it could be used as a skinning and butchering tool for big game hunters.
It truly is a bad ass knife.
The slight belly on the blade makes it a handy chopper on small stuff but I wouldn't want to cut a tree down with one. As regards length yes 6 inches of solingen steel
 
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