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Ray Mears

1 shot willie

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Just watched a clip and interview with Ray Mears on Breakfast T.V. with him sat by a small campfire in a wood.
Talking about nature and the joy of being outdoors......encouraging people to get out and enjoy it.
And what does he do?.........lights a fire on the ground......not the best example of caring for the land :rolleyes:

It takes little effort to carry a Firebox/small fire pit or the likes..... to save the ugly scars dotted about the woods and Forrests :(
 

Joecole

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Just watched a clip and interview with Ray Mears on Breakfast T.V. with him sat by a small campfire in a wood.
Talking about nature and the joy of being outdoors......encouraging people to get out and enjoy it.
And what does he do?.........lights a fire on the ground......not the best example of caring for the land :rolleyes:

It takes little effort to carry a Firebox/small fire pit or the likes..... to save the ugly scars dotted about the woods and Forrests :(
Rake away all the leaves and debris down to bare earth to a diameter of about 4 feet then have your small fire in the centre. Rake the ashes and make certain that no embers are left, flatten everything then cover with the original debris and within 24 hours there will be no sign that any fire had ever been there.
Do you remember the mess we found in the chestnut grove with the remains of the fire that the so called bushcrafter had left and all the debri shelters and other crap that they had left?
I know that when we camped up on the hill near Saltash we left stuff but that was with permission but we never abused the general area. Most of the mess up there was left by the 4x4 club because i spent an hour clearing up all the marker tape that they couldn't be bothered to take with them when they left
 

1 shot willie

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"Do you remember the mess we found in the chestnut grove with the remains of the fire that the so called bushcrafter had left and all the debri shelters and other crap that they had left?"


I do indeed Joe......maybe half the reason I lost that permission was the total disregard and respect shown by others.......and not just in that particular wood :(
 

Sharpfinger

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Ray Mears. 🤣

Its OK raking down to bare earth provided that there’s no peat/compacted leaf litter in the equation and/or things are totally, totally extinguished, often unachievable without the use (waste) of a lot of water.

In my (now extensive) experience in rural property security many so called Bushcrafters just can’t be arsed to do the job properly.

On several occasions I’ve had to deal with ‘underground’ fires, some that had appeared to have been properly extinguished only to find that days later they are still going beneath the surface, and on one occasion almost ten metres from the original fire site. We’ve had this occur in particular with people practising the so called Dakota fires.

In this day and age, as 1 shot says, there are plenty of easily portable options to move things up from the surface.

On an associated note our local National Trust manager has been pulling his hair out regarding the scorch marks and damage done to (many newly replaced) benches on his area by people placing ’throwaway‘ barbecues on them as well as directly onto grass areas.
Perhaps like the Chinese lanterns, throwaway barbecues should be banned? Discuss. 😆
 

Joecole

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Ray Mears. 🤣

Its OK raking down to bare earth provided that there’s no peat/compacted leaf litter in the equation and/or things are totally, totally extinguished, often unachievable without the use (waste) of a lot of water.

In my (now extensive) experience in rural property security many so called Bushcrafters just can’t be arsed to do the job properly.

On several occasions I’ve had to deal with ‘underground’ fires, some that had appeared to have been properly extinguished only to find that days later they are still going beneath the surface, and on one occasion almost ten metres from the original fire site. We’ve had this occur in particular with people practising the so called Dakota fires.

In this day and age, as 1 shot says, there are plenty of easily portable options to move things up from the surface.

On an associated note our local National Trust manager has been pulling his hair out regarding the scorch marks and damage done to (many newly replaced) benches on his area by people placing ’throwaway‘ barbecues on them as well as directly onto grass areas.
Perhaps like the Chinese lanterns, throwaway barbecues should be banned? Discuss. 😆
I remember years ago when I was still in the military we had some big fires up on the North York Moors and they were burning underground for what seemed an age. We would walk on what appeared to be solid ground and in the next instant you could be waste deep in a shower of sparks. For some of the younger lads brown underpants were the order of the day
 
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Ray Mears. 🤣

Its OK raking down to bare earth provided that there’s no peat/compacted leaf litter in the equation and/or things are totally, totally extinguished, often unachievable without the use (waste) of a lot of water.

In my (now extensive) experience in rural property security many so called Bushcrafters just can’t be arsed to do the job properly.

On several occasions I’ve had to deal with ‘underground’ fires, some that had appeared to have been properly extinguished only to find that days later they are still going beneath the surface, and on one occasion almost ten metres from the original fire site. We’ve had this occur in particular with people practising the so called Dakota fires.

In this day and age, as 1 shot says, there are plenty of easily portable options to move things up from the surface.

On an associated note our local National Trust manager has been pulling his hair out regarding the scorch marks and damage done to (many newly replaced) benches on his area by people placing ’throwaway‘ barbecues on them as well as directly onto grass areas.
Perhaps like the Chinese lanterns, throwaway barbecues should be banned? Discuss. 😆
+1 on banning the throwaway bbq.
 

Joecole

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+1 on banning the throwaway bbq.
I'll second that Mike, there was a big fire in Wareham Forest a couple of years ago that was traced back to a throwaway BBQ and you only have to walk along a beach and you see them everywhere. As regards country parks our local one has dedicated areas specifically for single use BBQ's but all the wooden bench tops have been replaced by concrete ones and you are not allowed to light BBQ's on the ground. Saying that you still find the remains just tossed into the bushes along with bottles and cans
 

Sharpfinger

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The local park has a specially built BBQ table made from steel with a dedicated bin for hot ashes…do they use it? No they cook on the tables…They put flammable rubbish in the hot ashes bin and hot ashes in the ordinary waste bin… It isn’t rocket science but for some reason they just don’t get it.
So they’re either malicious, or thick?

And that brings us back to the OP! 🤣 (As in the topic not the poster, just to qualify it).
 

lol

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The local park has a specially built BBQ table made from steel with a dedicated bin for hot ashes…do they use it? No they cook on the tables…They put flammable rubbish in the hot ashes bin and hot ashes in the ordinary waste bin… It isn’t rocket science but for some reason they just don’t get it.
They do a lot of those in NZ and in the US.......dedicated barbies.........
 

Ark79

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@1 shot willie dose thee not know that ray mear’s fire hovers above the ground ,he’s that good yi Ken🧐



I also agree the throw away BBQ should be band , see them blood everywhere, some folks take the “throw away” part to literally 👎 re-name the thing , “pit it in the bin after use BBQ” then the idiots might just do that, in saying that the clowns will set the bin on fire 🤷🏼‍♂️ Just ban it
 

Sharpfinger

Slightly Addicted
Messages
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Points
640
@1 shot willie dose thee not know that ray mear’s fire hovers above the ground ,he’s that good yi Ken🧐



I also agree the throw away BBQ should be band , see them blood everywhere, some folks take the “throw away” part to literally 👎 re-name the thing , “pit it in the bin after use BBQ” then the idiots might just do that, in saying that the clowns will set the bin on fire 🤷🏼‍♂️ Just ban it
🤣
On the other hand, if you’ve ever noticed people (usually gen X and the Millenials 😆) using them, the food often
looks positively carcinogenic on the outside and raw in the middle. The mesh grill is too close to the coals and they don’t let the coals burn down before putting food on it, so it could actually be a great natural selection device. 🤣
 
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