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Sleeping bag OR Clothing

Medwayman

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Have been looking for a decent(ish) bag , but have been reluctant to spend any amount of money, then i got thinking in a SHTF possibility do i want to go faffing around with a zip to get out and do what is needed???, no would be my answer.

would it not be best to get some decent thermals and some extra layers instead, i did look at ski suits with those at least you could jump up and do whatever?
 

Brambling

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38thfoot

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My experience if trying this is that the level of clothing required to match the warmth of a doss bag makes it just as hard to make a Move without subsequently melting; also you don’t get as much rest and your body therefore doesn’t recover.

38
 

Ark79

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I’ve done a lot of overnights when fishing and slept on some unsavoury ground without sleeping bags and mats... and the best thing I used was a floatation suit. Warm and padded... only thing is most of them are bright lol
 
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Stating the obvious but the weather will make a massive difference. I've kipped out pished plenty times over the years in the clothes I was wearing but if you're looking at doing it 'seriously' then you'll need 'something'. If its a scenario you're planning for then you could do your research but if it was last minute.com then maybe a smally sleeping bag that wasn't zipped up ???? If I can get away without doing the zip because I'm warm enough I see that as a bonus, there's a fair chance I'll be getting up to empty myself through the night at some point anyway, never mind zombies or whatever SHTF scenario you're thinking of.

A woolly blanket might do the trick too, work when they're wet but get heavy.
 

Brambling

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The only way you're going to know your own comfort level for sleeping outside is giving things a go and see what works for you. I'm a cold bod myself and even in summer can struggle to stay warm camping.
And as Bam said, weather and time of year can also be a factor to take into consideration.
 
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Erbswurst

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What is SHTF?

The best in my opinion is a combination of several layers of clothing for day or night and a relatively thin sleeping bag for the night on top of it.

That's the lightest, most comfortable and most versatile option.

Parts of the clothing can be used when other parts are drying. If it's cold I use all together.

A sleeping bag reduces the total surface. That's the reason, why it's more effective than clothing of the same weight during the night.

I tend to work mainly with clothing and less with sleeping bag weight, but always use both.
If it's really cold I love my Snugpack Special Forces Sleeping bag system, because it replaces me a heated sleeping room during really cold winter nights.

The coldest temperatures come in the end of the night, not during the day-
 

Harry Palmer

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I read somewhere that you sleep better when covered in a blanket/duvet/sleeping bag, its a psychological thing...your body like to feel 'secure'

You often get on survivalist sites the '5 items or less' challenge which to me are a load of bullocks IMHO. Plan your bug out right and you get to take clothes/shelter/sleeping bag.

Maybe go for something like Andes Nevado 400 4 Season 400 XL Camping Hiking Mummy Sleeping Bag | eBay

It won't be four season but with a bivy bag you should get sleep, certainly in most of the UK.

Look out on ebay for a used Buffalo sleeping bag, superb bit of kit.
 
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Erbswurst

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My sleeping bag is 220cm long outside, I am 185 cm tall and fit perfectly in it.

The Andes bag is 240 cm long. So it should fit perfectly to persons who are 200 or 205 cm tall.

A to large sleeping bag is not so good working like a bag which fits correctly.
And the user has to carry more weight and volume around, than is necessary.

But no question: The sleeping bag looks very interesting! Very good cut, good colour, good price.
 

Erbswurst

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A cheap sleeping bag usually works as good as an expensive one in the beginning, but doesn't last as long as an expensive one.

In my experience such cheap sleeping bags usually can be used round about 200 to 300 nights.
 

lol

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A cheap sleeping bag usually works as good as an expensive one in the beginning, but doesn't last as long as an expensive one.

In my experience such cheap sleeping bags usually can be used round about 200 to 300 nights.
For £18 or whatever, that would be brill!! 👍 At that, it would do me for years!!!
 

Erbswurst

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Yes! The cheap ones usually have a bigger packing size than the expensive ones for the same temperature, but if you use them mainly for weekend trips and not for long journeys, they will last you very long if you tread them carefully.
You have to know, that the fabric is relatively weak, the seams are the weak point.

But a sleeping bag for 180£ will not last ten times longer, that's for sure!
 

Harry Palmer

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Erbswurst, why not buy one, use it and give a review based on your personal experience rather than speculation on your part (again). A €180 sleeping bag can fail for numerous reasons.

You can spend €50+++ on a Cree torch or spend €10 on a torch of similar specifications, I've a load of cheap Crees and they all work just fine and last years. Price does not always reflect performance.
 
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Erbswurst, why not buy one, use it and give a review based on your personal experience rather than speculation on your part (again). A €180 sleeping bag can fail for numerous reasons.

You can spend €50+++ on a Cree torch or spend €10 on a torch of similar specifications, I've a load of cheap Crees and they all work just fine and last years. Price does not always reflect performance.
I couldn't resist so I've ordered one, at that price.... why not. Thanks for the heads up and as we're coming into the warmer weather I'm not sure when I'll get a chance to report back but review to follow at some point.

Oh and I'm a big fan of the cheap copy Cree's, some torch for less than 2 quid although I tend to put decent Nitecore batteries in them.
 

Harry Palmer

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Take a needle and thread with you Bam for when the sleeping bag falls apart ;)

I tend to go for torches running on AA batteries and use Eneloop batteries where I can, you can leave them in a drawer for a year and there is very little discharge.
 
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Take a needle and thread with you Bam for when the sleeping bag falls apart ;)

I tend to go for torches running on AA batteries and use Eneloop batteries where I can, you can leave them in a drawer for a year and there is very little discharge.
I like my Eneloops too, and like the AA compatability of the small Cree's, I keep one in most my jacket pockets. Got a couple that take the 18650, the missus prefers them but going off topic and don't want told off... :ninja:

Being well prepared, I carry a needle and thread (and a couple safety pins and buttons) in my wallet for just such emergencies. ;)
 
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