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Healthcare Snake bite action and treatment.

Bopdude

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They are normally long gone once they feel you comming.
Shy by nature.

That's very true, in most cases at least, they would rather move out of the way when they feel the vibrations coming, of course there are some exceptions to the rule, Black Mamba's being one, never saw one in the wild but they are known for chasing people :eek: and or lay in high places to strike from above :sneaky:
 

Joecole

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Joecole

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The only snakebite's i like is the alcoholic variety :rofl::rofl::rofl:

@1 shot willie, On a serious note, go informative post :thumbsup:
I agree Gary it is good info but our only venomous snake is the adder and your only at rick from said snake is if you're very very young or have an underlying health issue. When I was in the Yemen in the 60s we had some of the worlds most venomous snakes, spiders scorpions and centipedes in the world and I never once heard of anyone being stung or bitten. these things only strike to get food or in defence
 

Sharpfinger

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Good information.

Reminded me of a time one summer (mid ‘90s) that I was training some lads on Cannock Chase.

They were practising an advance to (visual) contact through a small valley. Prone crawl.
The weather was warm and dry.

One of them suddenly jumped up screaming and ran around (in full guillie cam) shouting that he’d been bitten by a huge snake. (Quite amusing).

What a [email protected] all the trainers thought and homed in on him to give him a rifting.
On inspection he had what looked like a small cut on his cheek just below the eye!

We walked over to where he had jumped up, no sign of any snakes, just an old piece of very weathered wooden sign board (defunct range warning probably) laying flat amongst the small grass hummocks.
The immediate supposition was that he’d crawled into one of the rough edges of it, face first. (Not an impossibility with the restricted vision/awareness that full head cam can cause.
That was, until one of the trainers lifted a corner of the board.

Beneath it were 3 of the biggest snakes I’d ever seen off the telly! I’m not joking. Although they were coiled up you could tell that one of them was several feet long and at least as thick as yer forearm.
Two were defo adders - classic colours; the third looked very smooth and light brown if I recall correctly.
Notably they were all curled around what looked like a clutch of eggs!
The large one lifted its head, showed it’s fangs and poked its tongue in our direction at which point David Attenborough dropped the corner of the board he’d been holding. We quickly advanced in the opposite direction but checking every step!😳

We stood the exercise down and casevac’d the lad to the nearest med centre.
He was none the worse for his encounter apart from feeling lousy for about 24 hours.
We told him he‘d failed that section and back-squadded him. 😆
We kept clear of that area for the rest of the course.

On a serious note though, if that had been a kiddy!…….😖
 
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