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Hunter Gatherer The Whys & Wherefores Of Survival Hunting.

Keith

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First of all I must explain that I am not a sporting shooter, I only hunt for food or in order to kill a feral predator.
Hunting for food is a lot different to hunting for sport. When you are hunting for food, especially in a survival situation, it is vitally important that you bring home the meat. You can't afford to waste ammunition, & you can't afford to waste time. If you take a long shot & miss or wound, you have scared all the game away in that vicinity if you are using a gun.
In my opinion, the gun is the best tool for making meat, but it has its limitations. You still need the skill to be able to get in range for a good killing shot. This means that you have to learn how to stalk your game. This applies even before you have spotted the game, you can't just go blundering along without paying attention to your surroundings & expect to suddenly find food just standing there waiting for you. Yes it can happen, but in a survival situation you need to be sure. This means moving slowly & paying attention. Stopping every now & then to have a good look all around you. Not only will you be looking for game, but you must also be on the look out for other people!
The .22 rimfire rifle is a good rifle for small game; rabbit, hare, pheasant, waterfowl. Regardless of the claimed range of a .22, I recommend that you keep the killing distance down to 50 yards/meters. On medium sized game such as goats or sheep or small deer, the .22 is not as effective & you need to get as close as you can.
Shotguns are good for all sizes of game providing you have the right ammunition & you are close enough for accuracy. Shotguns are not long range tools, even when using solid slugs or round ball.
The larger the caliber/gauge, the more expensive the ammunition, & the more this ammunition weighs. A .22 magnum would be a good choice, a bit more knock down power than the ordinary .22 but without too much weight or expense. But again, you need the skill to be able to place your shot, & you need to be able to stalk your quarry.
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Traditional Tools.
Muzzle-loading guns & rifles are good because they are more sustainable than a modern firearm. Round ball can be retrieved from shot game & remoulded for further use. The smoothbore muzzle-loader can do everything that the modern shotgun can do except that with bird shot the range is a little shorter. Muzzle-loader ammunition is a lot cheaper to obtain than modern ammunition.
A .32 caliber muzzle-loading rifle will take small game & medium sized game easily within 75 yards if you are a good shot. The ammunition is inexpensive per load, & again the lead can be retrieved from shot game & remoulded for further use. This means you can carry less lead & more gunpowder saving on weight.
Pistols can be used to hunt, but the range is shorter than that of a long gun. The muzzle-loading pistol can be rifled or smoothbore. I find the smoothbore more versatile because it can digest shot & round ball & even both at the same time, e.g. buck & ball. The pistol is of course much lighter to carry than a long gun, & if you have both a long gun & a pistol you can match them to use the same ammunition.
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The traditional bow is a good hunting tool, I do not recommend the use of a compound bow. Finding decent arrow woods in the wilderness can be hard enough, & you need the skill to be able to make an arrow, but finding something that will stand up to a compound bow will be even harder. Compound bows are not in my opinion sustainable. You can carry spare bow strings but there are still other parts on a compound that can malfunction. Again, you need to be skilled in using a bow & you will need the skill to stalk close in to your quarry.
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Spears can be used for hunting, but they are less efficient than a bow or gun. You need to be able to get very close to your game unless you are using a woomera such as the Australian Aboriginals use. Another way to use a spear is to wait hidden on a game trail & strike the quarry as it passes. This is far easier than stalking, but you need good cover & you need the wind in your face. An improvised spear can be made by securing a hunting knife to a spear shaft, but be aware that you could lose your knife in wounded game.

Throwing sticks are good for small game & in my opinion easier to master than a sling. Throwing sticks can be used on stationary game, or on wildfowl leaving the water on mass, but it is still a hit or miss method. The Australian Aboriginals use a boomerang, the version used for hunting will return if you miss your quarry in flight.
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Rabbit stick/throwing stick.

A tomahawk can be used to hunt small & medium sized game, but again you need to be able to stalk close to your quarry, & you need to be skilled in throwing a tomahawk.
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Prime

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I have a ( as one of my firearms ) a Lever Gun chambered in 38/357 mag - With a scope on top that is a light , nimble and very effective game getter and defensive tool - I really wouldn't want to be on the other end of its airborne presents. Small enough to be carried for a very long time and easy to shoot.
 

Prime

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And its also a 10 round capacity - which is handy! easy to top up on the move ( not a fan of magazines if I'm honest ) the energy delivered from a PC ( Pistol Calibre Round ) via a carbine gives some unique and interesting benefits - its a hornet of a round with sufficient wallop to play tag with the big boys.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.357_Magnum
 

Prime

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Is it similar to the Winchester patern?

Yes but mine is a MARLIN 1894

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marlin_Model_1894

Benefits of this model over the Winchester is that it ejects the empty cartridge to the side as opposed to the Winchester series which does it in a vertical direction. As the vertical ejects vertically it can interfere or make difficult or complicate the cycle for any scope to be mounted.

If we were still allowed genuine revolvers in this country I'd go for a 357 revolver as this in my opinion would make an excellent combination utilizing the same ammunition.

 

Prime

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Hmmmm , I don't think so - Its Ten Rounds and to be honest if you can't get the job done with Ten rounds you need a major rethink!!

I also have other Firearms but this is my 'goto' all around rifle I'd grab if it was all going down.

But 22lr is a good secondary calibre for many reasons.
 

Keith

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Yes but mine is a MARLIN 1894

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marlin_Model_1894

Benefits of this model over the Winchester is that it ejects the empty cartridge to the side as opposed to the Winchester series which does it in a vertical direction. As the vertical ejects vertically it can interfere or make difficult or complicate the cycle for any scope to be mounted.

If we were still allowed genuine revolvers in this country I'd go for a 357 revolver as this in my opinion would make an excellent combination utilizing the same ammunition.
I used to carry a .357 magnum revolver & a Marlin 1894 in 45/70. Both good calibers.
Keith.
 
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Hmmmm , I don't think so - Its Ten Rounds and to be honest if you can't get the job done with Ten rounds you need a major rethink!!

I also have other Firearms but this is my 'goto' all around rifle I'd grab if it was all going down.

But 22lr is a good secondary calibre for many reasons.
It's just that I was under the impression that Center fire rifles were only usually able to carry up to 5 in the magazine. I was expecting it to have had its capacity reduced. I'm not sure it's an absolute legal requirement but you would need a very generous spirited firearms officer to be able to get the variation for it otherwise.
 

38thfoot

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A lot of pistol calibrate rifles are held for gallery competitions, ergo later magazine tube required.

It's the same with s5 semi auto shotguns with 20 round drum mags; you'd be hard pressed to claim the need for rabbit hunting but practical shotgun comps are a justification.

38
 

38thfoot

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Not sure I like the ergos of straight pull rifles; there is an company that makes a modernised bolt action Enfield design in 5.56 that uses AR15 mags which I thinks looks elegantly whilst being eminently practical.



38
 

Prime

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Not sure I like the ergos of straight pull rifles; there is an company that makes a modernised bolt action Enfield design in 5.56 that uses AR15 mags which I thinks looks elegantly whilst being eminently practical.



38


I maybe a little confused but who is talking straight pull? not I .

The MARS Rifle linked above operates a interrupted cycle mechanism

 

Prime

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Agreed - maybe I hope not. There is also talk of the same company doing the same with a 9mm Pistol which would be nice.
 

38thfoot

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lonewolf

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do you mean assault and sub machine type rifles?
sorry, just trying to understand the terminology.
 
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