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Think You Have Seen It All?

Keith

Very Addicted
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I was going to say "now I have seen it all", but I doubt that is the case having seen the first part of this video. I see no skill involved using a ferrocerium rod to make fire, but purchasing a supply of fat wood from a dealer to take bush with you so you can make fire???!!! The mind boggles.

Fatwood,Drilling Ferro Rods Video.

I did not post the video itself, because I did not want to encourage people to watch it so the video producer could make money from it.

What sort of people would purchase fat wood to take bush with them to make fire (unless it was a city family on a picnic, which is not who this video is aimed at!)?

Keith.
 

lonewolf

Neo Luddite Prepared Survivalist.
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I don't know, even a steel for striking on flint has to be made by someone, it dosent come out of the ground like that.
although the fat wood does sound a bit strange, buying a spark striker is one thing but who buys fat wood, i'm not sure its even available in the UK.
 

greenbear

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It is - I saw some not too long ago at a garden centre - if someone is prepared to part with cash for something you can guarantee there is someone willing to sell it to them ;)
 

Keith

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It is a recent thing m8 :)
Actually it is only the name that is new, not the material. In the 18th century it was called candlewood. More information here if you are interested:

Keith.
 

lonewolf

Neo Luddite Prepared Survivalist.
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"think you have seen it all?" also applies to people in general and the stupid/silly things they do, like the woman who was decanting petrol from one container into another in her kitchen right next to a lit gas cooker during the "Fuel strikes" in the UK about 10 years ago.
 

Ystranc

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I have also never heard the term fat wood, I'm not sure if we're talking about the same thing but as a kid we used to knock the dead lower branches off pine trees in such a way that you took the whole knot off.. It's easy to do and it's like burning standing dead so it burns very hot and bright. We tended to use these in a large Kelly kettle. It spits and smokes but ideal in a rocket stove or Kelly kettle. It needs no tools to collect it other then a heavy stick to knock the knot off the tree trunk. It also improves the quality of the timber as the pine tree continues to grow without knots in its outer rings (our main reason for doing it)
I have also seen tar being extracted from pine roots by heating (it can be done on a very small scale in an old paint can) I'm told this is a useful bushcraft bowyer's resource but I've not yet tried it myself.
 

MikeR

Slightly Addicted
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Fatwood is a new one on me too. Maybe it's an Americanism. I find Pine spits a lot, so try not to use it if I can.
 

The Boogie Man

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I have also never heard the term fat wood, I'm not sure if we're talking about the same thing but as a kid we used to knock the dead lower branches off pine trees in such a way that you took the whole knot off.. It's easy to do and it's like burning standing dead so it burns very hot and bright. We tended to use these in a large Kelly kettle. It spits and smokes but ideal in a rocket stove or Kelly kettle. It needs no tools to collect it other then a heavy stick to knock the knot off the tree trunk. It also improves the quality of the timber as the pine tree continues to grow without knots in its outer rings (our main reason for doing it)
I have also seen tar being extracted from pine roots by heating (it can be done on a very small scale in an old paint can) I'm told this is a useful bushcraft bowyer's resource but I've not yet tried it myself.
They use this method to collect birch tar, which is then used as a glue to fix arrowheads and fletchings. Although in my opinion using it to fix fletchings is wasteful and not necessary as you can tie/thread fletchings.
 
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