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What you should actually do in a nuclear attack - and why most people get it wrong

Keith

Very Addicted
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Don't know where that saying came from, but I can think of a lot better things to kiss goodbye than my backside! Anyway, I don't give up that easily:)
Keith.
 

Ystranc

Moderator
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The initial blast is unlikely to effect me directly but fallout is something else. After Chernobyl fallout spread right around the northern hemisphere and because of rainfall and prevailing winds it covered North and West Wales with fallout.
 

Keith

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The initial blast is unlikely to effect me directly but fallout is something else. After Chernobyl fallout spread right around the northern hemisphere and because of rainfall and prevailing winds it covered North and West Wales with fallout.
Yes I remember hearing about that & was very concerned for my parents. I seem to recall that some politician was on the telly eating vegies & telling everyone it was okay!
Keith.
 

Keith

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Yup that's right, and then they slapped a ban on Welsh lamb from some parts of North Wales that lasted until 2 years ago.
I didn't know that, but better safe than sorry I guess.
Keith.
 

Harry Palmer

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Keith, its OK saying you don't give up easily, but when the fallout from an old and poorly maintained Russian reactor can impact the UK food chain for many years what do you think the impact of even a very limited nuclear exchange would do?
 

Ystranc

Moderator
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I looked into this a while back Harry and came up with a solution of sorts. It's not perfect but it could help keep a reasonably useful area of vegetable garden clear of radioactive fallout. Simply cover an area with the radon proof plastic damp proof course that is put down under the foundations of new builds, mulch over it with bark chips and come back to it after everything has calmed down.
 

Keith

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Keith, its OK saying you don't give up easily, but when the fallout from an old and poorly maintained Russian reactor can impact the UK food chain for many years what do you think the impact of even a very limited nuclear exchange would do?
The best I can Harry, I am certainly not going to kiss my rear end.
Keith.
 

lonewolf

Neo Luddite Prepared Survivalist.
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anyone in the target blast zone is probably toast but anyone outside of that has at least a chance.
its the fallout that is the problem but I read somewhere that that dissipates after about 2 days, depends on winds and wind currents I guess.
 

Ystranc

Moderator
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LW, different isotopes decay at different speeds. The most reactive tend to have a very short half life but you would be best to maximise the time you shelter in order to minimise your cumulative dose of radiation. weeks rather then days.
That article just made me think of "When the wind blows"
 

lonewolf

Neo Luddite Prepared Survivalist.
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yes, Keith's piece said something about the longer one can stay indoors before venturing out the better.
this would depend on how much food and water one stores, eventually people will be forced to go outside to look for these things.
 

lonewolf

Neo Luddite Prepared Survivalist.
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I wonder what will happen to members of the general public who don't prepare and believe that "it'll never happen"? I guess they'll be doing what HP suggested!
 
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