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Who Remembers The Good Old Days

Joecole

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#1
Standing on the edge of a corn field that was being harvested and catching the rabbits as they ran out, we could have a dozen or so hanging in the larder on a good day. Potato picking to earn a few bob but that could be hard work. Building shelters in the local woods and sleeping in them. I think back to all the good things that we could do in those days that the modern generation can't or wont do now
 

Ark79

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#4
My grans had fields rivers,burns (creeks). Remember it well build dens and fishing for hours. Making rope swings. Lighting fires. We use to hollow out the large hay bails and play in them. Cracking memories :thumbsup: My kids will do the same if I have my way that’s for sure :D
 

The Boogie Man

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#5
Those good old days weren't so good for me folks. I grew up in the bombed out ruins of a Port city, we played in "bombed buildings" as children, finding entertainment such as jumping across the upstairs floor beams in destroyed houses. We lived in slum housing near the Docks because my Father was a Fisherman. If the catch was bad he didn't get paid, and I remember times when we only had bread & Jam for food, but Mother did her best. She used to play a game with us at night when we'd listen for the Mouse traps going off in the front room, "little nippers" they were called. I didn't see an inside bath/toilet until I was 13. The community was strong and we helped each other out as best we could. You grow up quick in conditions like that.
 

Ystranc

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#6
I guess I had it much easier then you did BoogieMan...I don't remember being hungry but growing up in 1970's Liverpool during the strikes while still having memories of rural Ireland to compare it to wasn't much fun. Since then I've moved around a bit but I've never really fitted in with other people, my trust is an expensive commodity these days.
 
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#7
Sorry to hear it Boogie Man, I guess as a younger generation we didn't go through much hardship in that way, I always remember my Gran telling me stories of rationing etc :(
 

The Boogie Man

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#8
Sorry to hear it Boogie Man, I guess as a younger generation we didn't go through much hardship in that way, I always remember my Gran telling me stories of rationing etc :(
You might be surprised to hear that this was in the late 60's early 70's mate! over 95% of houses were destroyed, and twenty years after the War large areas of the city were still bomb sites, I was born in 1963. This photo is circa 1976- this is at the top of our street.
 

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Ystranc

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#9
Still, a lot of Hull is looking very good now, the people are friendly and it's one of the few cities that I enjoy visiting.
Liverpool remains a complete toilet.
 

Joecole

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#10
My grans had fields rivers,burns (creeks). Remember it well build dens and fishing for hours. Making rope swings. Lighting fires. We use to hollow out the large hay bails and play in them. Cracking memories :thumbsup: My kids will do the same if I have my way that’s for sure :D
You can't beat it Mark, better than a play station any day
 

Joecole

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#11
You might be surprised to hear that this was in the late 60's early 70's mate! over 95% of houses were destroyed, and twenty years after the War large areas of the city were still bomb sites, I was born in 1963. This photo is circa 1976- this is at the top of our street.
We were lucky Boogie, only about 3 bombs landed on our town dropped by German planes that had been damaged
 
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#12
You might be surprised to hear that this was in the late 60's early 70's mate! over 95% of houses were destroyed, and twenty years after the War large areas of the city were still bomb sites, I was born in 1963. This photo is circa 1976- this is at the top of our street.
Very surprised, and shocked if I'm honest, I was born in '65 in Croyden and never saw the likes :(
 

Keith 66

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#14
I was born in 61, luckily i grew up on the edge of what was still a village, My parent house backed directly onto Benfleet downs overlooking the Thames estuary. As a kid me & my mates worked up the local farm, helping out moving cattle & then with the harvest, mostly barley. Hard graft 7:30 till 7:00pm filling big 3 bushel sacks from a hopper. It was the summer of 76 & i had a tan like an abbo!
We got paid a pittance but the Farmer John was hard & fair, he had a razor scar from a friday night fight at the Monico on Canvey as a young man, dunno what happened to the other bloke! His Dad had a real proper Essex accent one of the last in the south of the county & nothing like the estuary english of today.
My Dad & i shot over the farm & local woods & marshes, Pigeon & rabbit shooting all year & wildfowling in the winter. I was probably the last generation that enjoyed this freedom locally. & i count my lucky stars that i did so.
Today my old shooting grounds are gentrified with footpaths & signage, now a poncy country park.
I still have my catty in my pocket & my dog at my side. Have a mooch every day.
 
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#15
I was born 67 and grew up on the rural edge of north east Manchester ( originally an overspill area), we played "ralio (?) " for days and explored the woods and a local quarry , swimming in Dams and jumping streams , great times and I think a catalyst for my love of the outdoors.

Kids today are too reliant on their technology ................
 
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#17
great getting in from on a friday teatime grab somthing to eat and gone for the the weekend being told to be back on sunday tea time to get a bath ready for school on monday
 

Joecole

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#18
great getting in from on a friday teatime grab somthing to eat and gone for the the weekend being told to be back on sunday tea time to get a bath ready for school on monday
In those days I think it was a lot safer for kids to wander than it is now Jeff
 
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