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Woodland walk and lunch by the fire

Kitstaa

Slightly Talkative
Messages
11
Points
90
Age
19
Enjoyed a frosty late-morning walk today, cooked beans and made tea by the fire I started with "Burner Firestarters" looking to make a bow drill soon as I would like to learn more "primitive" techniques of doing things, what opinion do you all have on bow drills? Or what is your favourite way of starting a fire? Snapchat-1121800912.jpg
 

Kitstaa

Slightly Talkative
Messages
11
Points
90
Age
19
Well lol. A have tried the bow drill about 6 times and failed every time:rofl: so my advice is take a piece of soft wood home and let it dry out before you make your spindle and harth board with it. :thumbsup:

Nice picture :thumbsup:
Thanks Mark! And cheers for the advice, have the feeling I'm gonna go through the same thing, think the harth board definitely has to be as dry as possible for the heat to build up, but I'm sure I'll find a technique! Will keep you updated :)
 

Kitstaa

Slightly Talkative
Messages
11
Points
90
Age
19
I still struggle with the ferro rod so one thing at a time for me LOL
Haha I saw you use birch bark on your YouTube channel? I've seen another person use cotton wool buds dipped in vaseline using a ferro rod as a firestarter and then put birch bark on top once it is burning, perhaps if you dry it on a window sill or by the fire you may be able to flake it up in the morning/ when it is dry? I have zero experience I'm just guessing that that could work, let me know how you get on with the ferro rod soon!
 

G1ZmO

Moderator
Staff member
Messages
1,673
Points
1,090
Age
54
The cotton wool pads soaked in wax and vaseline is my default method and I can start that with the ferro rod without any problem but have been challenging myself over the winter to only use what I can source in the woods. Don't worry, I'll document all of my attempts (even the failures lol)
 

Kitstaa

Slightly Talkative
Messages
11
Points
90
Age
19
The cotton wool pads soaked in wax and vaseline is my default method and I can start that with the ferro rod without any problem but have been challenging myself over the winter to only use what I can source in the woods. Don't worry, I'll document all of my attempts (even the failures lol)
Ah yes I understand now! When I get a bit better I'm going to do that too, and will document the failures too hahaha
 

1 shot willie

Administrator
Staff member
Messages
14,302
Points
1,770
Age
65
Hi, Kitstaa.

Glad you had a good trip mate...and lunch sounded nice.
What ever fire lighting technique you adopt......try and include keeping fire contained and off the ground:thumbsup:
Nothing worse than seeing fire scars dotted around the countryside.;)

You can make a small Hobo stove from an old can or go a step further and buy something more elaborate when you are ready to.





https://www.amazon.co.uk/EasySleep-Pro-BBQ008710-Foldable-Barbeque/dp/B006OU30I4



Fires on the floor can be dangerous and cause horrific forest fires.
Some forest floors are like peat and even after your best efforts to extinguish your fire......it may still burn underneath and eventually break out days or months later.

Leave no trace........ and practice safely :thumbsup:
 

Kitstaa

Slightly Talkative
Messages
11
Points
90
Age
19
Hi, Kitstaa.

Glad you had a good trip mate...and lunch sounded nice.
What ever fire lighting technique you adopt......try and include keeping fire contained and off the ground:thumbsup:
Nothing worse than seeing fire scars dotted around the countryside.;)

You can make a small Hobo stove from an old can or go a step further and buy something more elaborate when you are ready to.





https://www.amazon.co.uk/EasySleep-Pro-BBQ008710-Foldable-Barbeque/dp/B006OU30I4



Fires on the floor can be dangerous and cause horrific forest fires.
Some forest floors are like peat and even after your best efforts to extinguish your fire......it may still burn underneath and eventually break out days or months later.

Leave no trace........ and practice safely :thumbsup:
I've ensured I kept the fire on logs trying my best to protect the ground underneath and letting the fire die down then pouring water over the fire and in holes around where the fire was to reduce the risk of a forest fire.. Hobo stoves look good i will definitely give them a go! Once again, I will keep you updated!
 
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