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Keith

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Just how well prepared do you think the average prepper in the UK is to handle a major shtf situation? I ask this for various reasons, 1) in many survival blogs the emphasis always seems to be on gadgetry, "you must have this" or "if you are serious about survival then you will need one of these".
2) the same goes on videos, 4WD vehicles & trailers loaded with gear. I have no problem with this, but can these people survive if they have to ditch their vehicle?
3) the one thing that stands out most about my visits back to the UK is how mild everything seemed compared to the lifestyle over here. There are those over here I must admit that won't go bush without their generator & all the gear to make it feel like home. But most I think tend to "rough it". This is not to imply that we are uncomfortable when we go bush, but it means that we in general do not take many home comforts with us.
If the weather is fine, then we do not need a tent. One sleeps on the ground or perhaps on a camp bed with a mossy net. If you don't have a mossy net then you pile buffalo chips on the fire & sit up all night with a bottle of rum. The bush here has many dangers, but if you ask people, they will give you a vague look. This is because they are used to these dangers being present. Some may ignore them to their peril, others keep the dangers in mind, but it gives you some idea of what life is like over here. For the most part people make do, they manage. I am not talking about city dwellers, they live in a world of their own.

So how do you rate the average prepper in the UK? Do you think the majority are prepared? Or are they just playing at it & kidding themselves?
Keith.
 

lonewolf

Neo Luddite Prepared Survivalist.
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there seems to be too much emphasis, especially in the UK, on GEAR and gadgets, not skills or knowledge, I have thought for many years that some prepping is only there to prolong the consumer society, this sort of thing is okay if one is only prepping for minor events, I mean why bother to learn skills and acquire knowledge when all your prepping for is something that will only last a week at most??
 
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In answer to your question Keith I would say that most preppers in the UK are hobbyists and the general population is in total denial as to the seriousness of our situation regarding fuel dependency, food imports, the environment and national security.
In saying this I don't mean to put anyone down because their preps aren't as advanced as mine because there are plenty of people out there with different/much larger skill sets then me. Once you can replace or build everything that you need while feeding yourself and your dependents you'll be on the right path.
Stored goods, a bit of hunting, foraging and wild camping isn't going to get anyone past anything other then a short term event in the UK, we can't even manage to feed the entire population using intensive farming methods.
There are so many things to learn or re learn that no one person can cover more then the basics and a couple of specialist subjects.
 

Barbara

Extremely Talkative
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241
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Age
53
Yes, l admit it, l am a hobbyist prepper. l do not have lots of gadgets but can start a fire in at least 3 different ways. As l've said elsewhere, post SHTF l plan on staying where l am as we have water and fuel (wood) easily available nearby. l know that l need to grow more of our food and also need to explore different methods of preserving it as we are nowhere near self sufficient in anything other than jam! Usually l freeze stuff or make jam, chutney etc. Knowing me, l will probably be the last person to know SHTF has happened, not being on social media where everyone seems to get their news nowadays, so the supermarkets will be empty by the time l get there.
l am sorry if l have disappointed you, Keith, LW, Y. Maybe l had better go away now.
 
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A think there is to much emphasis on what makes a preper.

A mean what is a hobby preper and what’s the alternative.


If it all goes tits up. At some point stored supplies will run out...so we will have to rely on what we know and how mentally strong we are. So knowledge and skills are so much higher that stored items (although they help)

You don’t need tools or stored food and water to survive. Making sensible choices is way more important and a healthy body and mind. So bearing this in mined I think more of the general public would survive. But again this depends on the event that takes place to cause shtf
 

lonewolf

Neo Luddite Prepared Survivalist.
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I don't think your a hobby prepper Barbara, I think you've got it sorted more than some.
 

38thfoot

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There is also the fact that many individuals who don't consider themselves to be preppers are well equipped to survive through dint of their particular lifestyle and experiences. Plenty of wild campers are used to roughing it; as a soldier I've slept under a tarp on the floor far far more times than I've clamped or even slept in a tent, there are many many others in the same boat.

38
 

Keith

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Yes, l admit it, l am a hobbyist prepper. l do not have lots of gadgets but can start a fire in at least 3 different ways. As l've said elsewhere, post SHTF l plan on staying where l am as we have water and fuel (wood) easily available nearby. l know that l need to grow more of our food and also need to explore different methods of preserving it as we are nowhere near self sufficient in anything other than jam! Usually l freeze stuff or make jam, chutney etc. Knowing me, l will probably be the last person to know SHTF has happened, not being on social media where everyone seems to get their news nowadays, so the supermarkets will be empty by the time l get there.
l am sorry if l have disappointed you, Keith, LW, Y. Maybe l had better go away now.
Barbara, you have not disappointed anyone on this forum, & we all value your input. This topic/post was not intended as a "sort the men from the boys" post, it was just a genuine enquirie. I have been on several survival forums, blogs & video channels & the impression I have is like lonewolf said, there is a tendency to rely on gear & gadgets.
You have never struck me as being a person playing at what you do, you seem to be a a person who is seriously trying to achieve over time a state of independence. Don't underestimate what you have achieved so far Barbara, I think you are ahead of the game.
Regards, Keith.
 

lonewolf

Neo Luddite Prepared Survivalist.
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There is also the fact that many individuals who don't consider themselves to be preppers are well equipped to survive through dint of their particular lifestyle and experiences. Plenty of wild campers are used to roughing it; as a soldier I've slept under a tarp on the floor far far more times than I've clamped or even slept in a tent, there are many many others in the same boat.

38
camping has nothing to do with being prepared, that's a common fallacy, and anyone who thinks they are "roughing" it is doing it wrong.(Baden Powell said that!).
 

greenbear

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There is, IMHO, too much emphasis on gear and perhaps not enough on what one will find to eat or even where to live.

But a broad view is possibly best.
 

lonewolf

Neo Luddite Prepared Survivalist.
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that's the problem I think BB, there is so much emphasis on the latest "gear" which will break or simply wear out over time when we should be concentrating on skills and knowledge which will last a lifetime.
 

Keith

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I agree with Brownbear & lonewolf, though I think equipment is important. But it must be the RIGHT equipment & not as lonewolf says necessarily the "latest gear'. If you have ever practiced "naked in the wilderness" skills you will know the difference the right equipment makes. It makes life easier, more tolerable. The comfort level may seem low to non existent to those who are used to their creature comforts, but take my word for it, My 18th century gear is a world away from starting out naked & having to make all your own tools, shelter, bedding & clothing!
Keith.
 
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How I look at it is. Really doesn't matter when the tool was made. Now ,then ,future! If it works then it works. There is a reason tools from history still get used today as Keith dose and many others. They work... there was plenty of crap tools in history that didn’t work. same as today’s tools. The ones that work will stay !

When I buy something or make it and it gives me confidence when out and about then it was worth the money or the time it took to acquire it.

Cost of an item is not relevant to function imo...and that works both ways. Cheaper! Or dearer!

No one can live in the wilderness without tools. There our replacement for claws.
 

lonewolf

Neo Luddite Prepared Survivalist.
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that's why flint napping was invented, even our ancient ancestors needed tools.
and antlers for picks.
 

Keith

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that's why flint napping was invented, even our ancient ancestors needed tools.
and antlers for picks.
True, but just how many people would have the skill to do this? Just imagine the average bloke having to leave home in a hurry. They panic & no time to grab the BOB. How long do you think it would take them to get set up with primitive gear & shelter? The problem is time. You need time to work these things out & if it is winter, that time is very short! If they don't know how to make fire, then they are not likely to survive the first winters night. I guess this is coming back to what you said earlier, skills are important. But I have a feeling that most people's skills do not include "naked into the wilderness skills", so good proven equipment is still important.
Keith.
 

lonewolf

Neo Luddite Prepared Survivalist.
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that's what I've always said about people saying they will go and live in the woods, even in the mild UK without gear-modern or old, they probably wont make it, any idiot can survive in the summer months but in the winter when its cold, wet and dark for most of the time it wont be any picnic, and I cant see many modern British women putting up with that for long.
 
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