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A little walk...........

lol

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Off for a little explore on foot Monday, a first for me, with BanzaiBro, to sus out a potential wildcamp spot in some nearby woods. It is not a permission. Such potentials are rare around here........
Will hopefully try the Firetrough and some fire anchors, so a ground fire too if we think we can........ All gone in the French surplus rucksack thingy........
 

1 shot willie

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Hope the weather is kind for you and your mate Lol........... have a good burn up and recce.
Don't forget the piccies :whistle: :thumbsup:
 

lol

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What a beautiful day it turned out, especially after the last few days of cold and cloud: the sun shone, and grass stood a little straighter and the fritillaries continue to punch to the sky, soon to flower.
Found a fabulous spot in the woods and ponds, beautifully hidden with a lot of growth around as a screen and no close footpaths.
For company, swans, buzzards and heron.....and banzai who found the spot!
Small ground fire, with fire irons, and the firetrough with a trangia burner.......bacon (molasses cure!) and sausages in baps and wraps, and hot chocolate and just a bloody good time. :thumbsup:
It will also make a perfect spot for a walk in wildcamp.
Who forgot his phone? Me, so photos will follow as as as Banzai forwards them on!!

(Used the modded French F2 bag......)
 

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lol

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1/ arrival and setting up
2/fire on
3/ fire irons
4/ firetrough and trangia burner
5/ view out..ponds and woods behind

(courtesy BanzaiBro)
 

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lol

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Interesting...educate me?

The site was chosen as damp earth, an area cleared, and the spoil replaced after the fire embers had been soaked and mostly...removed. I should have taken a picture as we left, but anyone immediately coming in would have been hard pressed to know anyone had been there at all, (I would say that?) much less had a fire. Genuinely.

Would should I have done instead? :confused:

No, not "each to their own", if it's wrong?
 

1 shot willie

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Here you go Lol. :)


  • Campfires can ignite peat or roots under the surface causing a smoldering underground fire.
    • Peat and root fires can smolder uncontrolled for months underground.
    • If conditions are right these fires can spring to the surface a distance away from the original campfire causing a larger forest fire.
    • These fires may burn until a heavy rainfall extinguishes them.

Solution:
fire pan
  • Skip the campfire in areas that may have peat deposits.
  • Avoid building a fire directly on top of tree root systems.
  • Make sure fires are completely out by dousing them with plenty of water.
  • Use a backpacking fire pan.

  • Campfires leave behind unsightly fire scars and blackened rocks.
    • Fires sterilize the soil underneath preventing any vegetation from regrowing for many years.
    • When campers make fires that are too big they often don't burn the coals down to white ash, leaving behind ugly mounds of charred wood.
    • Rocks blackened from use in a fire ring are an eyesore and remain that way for years.
Solution:

  • Where legal use existing fire areas instead of making new ones.
  • Make smaller fires that burn down to white ash.
  • Remove any evidence of your campfire by discretely spreading any leftover charcoals, dismantling rock fire rings, and naturalizing the affected area.
  • Small fires don't need rocks for fire rings if at least a 5 foot radius is cleared of flammable leaf litter or if a fire pan is used.


:thumbsup:
 

Ystranc

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Here you go Lol. :)


  • Campfires can ignite peat or roots under the surface causing a smoldering underground fire.
    • Peat and root fires can smolder uncontrolled for months underground.
    • If conditions are right these fires can spring to the surface a distance away from the original campfire causing a larger forest fire.
    • These fires may burn until a heavy rainfall extinguishes them.

Solution:
fire pan
  • Skip the campfire in areas that may have peat deposits.
  • Avoid building a fire directly on top of tree root systems.
  • Make sure fires are completely out by dousing them with plenty of water.
  • Use a backpacking fire pan.

  • Campfires leave behind unsightly fire scars and blackened rocks.
    • Fires sterilize the soil underneath preventing any vegetation from regrowing for many years.
    • When campers make fires that are too big they often don't burn the coals down to white ash, leaving behind ugly mounds of charred wood.
    • Rocks blackened from use in a fire ring are an eyesore and remain that way for years.
Solution:

  • Where legal use existing fire areas instead of making new ones.
  • Make smaller fires that burn down to white ash.
  • Remove any evidence of your campfire by discretely spreading any leftover charcoals, dismantling rock fire rings, and naturalizing the affected area.
  • Small fires don't need rocks for fire rings if at least a 5 foot radius is cleared of flammable leaf litter or if a fire pan is used.


:thumbsup:
All sound advice, there have been plenty of wildfires caused by disposable BBQs and poorly sited camp fires in sensitive areas during the last 12 months of lockdown...the common factors are usually carelessness and inexperience.
Making sure that a fire is kept small, isn't left unattended and is fully extinguished when finished with (the ground cleared and cold to the touch) should mean that there aren't any issues.
A lot of camp sites are used repeatedly, we often assume that we are the only person that uses a certain spot but in reality good camping sites are at a premium. No one wants to turn up and see rubbish or wanton damage at a favourite camp site so removing all trace as Lol did and Bill's post suggested is an important courtesy to everyone who uses that place.
 
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